read this: the eco edit

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People Tree, a fair trade fashion label based in London, just released their second Eco Edit digital magazine. This one focuses on life after the Rhana Plaza collapse. It's pretty bleak, but it's so important that we read firsthand accounts and see the faces of those affected. Sympathy is best drawn out of us by personal stories; if we feel we know someone, we're much more likely to care for them. More of this story-collecting would be good for the fair trade movement as long as it's done in a way that unifies rather than alienates, that makes us realize the other is just like us. No white savior tales, just collections of narratives translated plainly.

people tree eco edit

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1 comment

  1. I saw their edition! You make some really good points, and the thing is, we are in this together. The workers at Rhana Plaza were moms and dads, husbands and wives, trying to make a living for their families and themselves. As I've learned more about fair trade and ethical clothing, I've stopped buying things made in Bangladesh. But I think about the workers I've read about and their stories, and I wonder how we can support their work and make sure they are paid a fair wage. Did you see The Guardian's interactive, "The Shirt on Your Back"? It's a really good look at the story and also talks about the economic side effects of the collapse a year later. http://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2014/apr/bangladesh-shirt-on-your-back

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