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YSTR Clothing Part 2: Building Conscious Community

YSTR Clothing beach club conscious community YSTR Clothing beach club conscious community
I was not compensated for this post, but I did receive items for review from YSTR Clothing, and there are some affiliate links throughout.

In yesterday's post, I introduced sustainable fashion line, YSTR, which produces a capsule friendly collection in California out of eco-conscious and deadstock fabric.

In today's post, in addition to showing a few more outfits, I wanted to delve into the number one, non-material way to make strides as ethical citizens: intentional community. 


Intentional communities have existed in one form or another for centuries, most often associated with religious sects, but also taking form around particular ideologies. At its core, an intentional community exists to promote "a high degree of social cohesion and teamwork." Participants make and eat meals together, participate in daily rituals, share resources, and co-promote a particular lifestyle. My town boasts a still-thriving 1960s era commune that produces tofu and a small but mighty intentional community run through the Episcopal church. I bet if you look around, you'll find examples of these tiny socialist networks, as well (is there a convent nearby?).

YSTR Clothing beach club conscious communityYSTR Clothing beach club conscious community

Close knit, co-reliant communities can be effective paths to social and personal change because they create a foundation that instills confidence and fosters creative conversation. Because people start with similar frameworks, they can more easily build upon each other's ideas, and progress comes more quickly. My experience in conscious consumer communities online has illuminated that for me. The only thing better would be if there was a space to have conscious conversations in person.

Turns out, there is.


YSTR owns a beach club in Malibu where calm and collaboration are meant to thrive. In their words:

The goal in hosting our members at the private beach club is to create a community of like-minded individuals that think, love, and inspire one another. We want to share with you what a conscious lifestyle looks and feels like, and link you with people who share the same passion for a better planet.

Tier 2 and 3 capsule subscription members get automatic access to the house as a part of their membership, and can bring up to three friends. Though I haven't visited myself, I am intrigued by the concept, and think that we should try harder in our own locales to create spaces where these types of conversations can take place. It doesn't have to be a formal commune. We can do our part to promote community by eating more meals together, hosting "salon" type events with particular topics in mind, lovingly holding each other accountable, and participating in local community organizing efforts. My friends and I attend church together and eat together 2-3 times a week. Seeing each other often helps us stay aware of each other's needs and push each other toward our goals.

YSTR Clothing beach club conscious community
A quick note on what I'm wearing:

In the first full outfit, I'm wearing the Edie Top with the Jett Tie Pant in Black ($178). The Jett pants are made out of a linen/poly blend that is somehow both structured and breathable. A simple elastic band and attached tie belt make these super easy to wear.

In the second outfit, I paired the pants with the Anaelle Top ($128), a drapey, textured pinstripe blouse with a high neck. I'm kind of fascinated by the details - from the slit in the back to the buttons to the ruffles at the neck - that add a lot of interest without becoming overwhelming. The blouse feels, paradoxically, quite simple.

To read more about YSTR, check out yesterday's post.

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