Capsule Wardrobe | Ethical and Secondhand Spring Closet Additions

Capsule Wardrobe | Ethical and Secondhand Spring Closet Additions

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I've been a bit of a shopaholic this season.

On the one hand, it's normal. I'm anxiously awaiting warm days and have this idea that buying the appropriate clothing will somehow usher spring into being. And the number of ads for clothing, in terms of traditional ads and sponsored posts on the blogs I follow, increases astronomically in the weeks leading up to spring.

But I know that some of it is just me feeling stressed out, overworked, and pressed for time. I shop because it brings temporary relief, but what I really need is a vacation.

That being said, I can at least say I'm happy with the clarity of style I've developed over the last year, and that has kept me from buying (too much) stuff I regret. Anything that hasn't worked has been due to fit rather than style.

For reference, I did one of these posts last year, and I haven't changed very much of my core spring wardrobe. There were a few items listed there, like the Modern Babos from Everlane, that I ended up returning because I couldn't find the right fit. And I donated nearly all of the cardigans/jackets listed and sold my Fortress of Inca booties (they were too big).

See my Spring 2018 wardrobe here

My goal for this season was to bring in a bit of freshness in terms of silhouette and print. One issue with implementing a smaller wardrobe is that you often end up with a lot of basics and nothing that brings in your personal spin on style. Plus, I wear a lot of my basics, like plain tees and denim, year round, so it makes sense to inject some season-specific pieces into my wardrobe to keep those items interesting.

I purchased almost all my spring items secondhand this season, making a loose list in my head of what I was looking for before heading out to shop:

*I bought the mustard duster from Back Beat Rags because I couldn't find a secondhand one made of natural fiber. The navy linen dress was an etsy indie designer purchase.

My total spend on these items, including things I bought new, was around $225, and I made a conscious effort to only spend what I made reselling things on Poshmark. I was lucky enough to find most of these items on a Baltimore thrift trip with fellow blogger, Jess, from Jess With Less.

I realize that that's a lot of stuff by minimalist standards, but I'm keeping in mind that most of these pieces will get even more use in the warmest months of June-September, so they have a long life span in my closet.

In addition to thrifted goods, I saved up some Everlane store credit and purchased:

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