#fashrev

FashRev Week | My Fashion Revolution Love Story

Fashion Revolution Love Story Fashion Revolution Love Story ethical fashion

Welcome to the Fashion Revolution!


Fashion Revolution was founded in direct response to the Rana Plaza Garment Factory collapse that killed over 1,100 people on April 24th, 2013. This week, we remember the victims of this and related garment factory tragedies and use our voices to demand justice for garment workers around the world.

The fact is that many survivors of the Rana Plaza collapse are still awaiting agreed-upon compensation and, among those who were injured, over 40% are unable to work. Meanwhile, workers around the world continue to fight for fair wages and safe working conditions. For more information about the current state of the industry, read the suggested links at the end of this post.

Through Fashion Revolution, consumers and fair trade organizations around the world join together to hold companies accountable for their labor standards, asking #whomademyclothes? and sharing positive stories about beloved garments and better business models. This year, the Ethical Influencer Network has decided to focus on one particular prompt provided by Fashion Revolution: Love Story.

The idea is simple: share a story about a piece of clothing that you cherish. We do this to combat the idea that fashion is throw-away, and to consider the ways that pieces bought and cared for with love positively impact our lives.
  Fashion Revolution Love Story ethical fashion
Wearing: Dress - The Kissing Tree Vintage circa 2011; Shoes - Etiko
Fashion Revolution Love Story ethical fashion
College Graduation, 2011 | Spring 2013 | Winter 2016

The item I'm featuring this year is a vintage 90s skater dress I bought from The Kissing Tree Vintage* in 2011 (oddly enough, the owner lives in the town I grew up in) . It means a lot to me because it was my first foray into vintage shopping, and I was hooked. I love the sturdy knit cotton of an early 90s garment, and I've always found this dress to be flattering and comfortable, with its wide v-neck and eye catching back seam. It creates an hourglass silhouette while gently skimming over my body, and the crochet accents on the sleeves are a big hit - they always prompt an amused comment or two.

I wore this dress under my gown for my college graduation, at the crappy customer service job I had the following summer, during my first Virginia summer, at parties and church gatherings, and off and on when the weather and occasion suited it.

Now that I'm in my late 20s and manage a shop, the hem feels a little short to be appropriate for everyday wear, but it goes great over leggings and is still perfect for weekends winery-hopping or hanging out with friends.

This dress has seen me through the highs and lows of post-college soul searching, tragedies, and triumphs, and I can't look at it without feeling thankful for the journey it's seen me through.

To join in Love Stories on social media, post a picture with a description and use the hashtags #lovedclotheslast #fashionrevolution #30wears and/or #fashrev.

Suggested Reading:


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Learn more about Fashion Revolution here. 


#whomademyclothes? ZADY knows

fashion revolution day 2015 zady

Zady is an ethical brand and business that goes above and beyond your average ethics-minded company. They're activists who made a huge splash when they bought a full page ad in the Wall Street Journal to post their manifesto a couple years ago. They're also the US headquarters for the Fashion Revolution Day movement (are you wearing your clothes inside out today?)

To highlight the fact that labor rights and sustainability go hand in hand, Zady released their .02 T-Shirt on Earth Day and just before Fashion Revolution Day. It's made from start to finish in the United States, so the supply chain is transparent and traceable.

We need to demand better in every step of the supply chain: better regulation, better materials, better treatment of people and planet. One way for companies to ensure that this is being done is to source and manufacture products on a smaller scale, within the same region (Everlane did this with their soon-to-be-released street shoe) or closer to the parent company, like Zady did with the .02 tee. We can't change an industry if we don't know what's going on inside of it, and companies don't feel obligated to hold themselves accountable if they're not even sure who makes their clothes, so we need to keep asking Who made my clothes? until we get real answers.

The conscientious consumer movement feels like Guerrilla warfare a lot of the time. We're full of ideas, but we're not united. We can't always see who or what we're fighting against, or who we're fighting for. Transparency is vital and there's no better time than now to start moving forward together.

So wear your clothes inside out today, or don't. But stir up people to join the team and spread the word. We need all the help we can get.


Read more Fashion Revolution Day posts from the Ethical Blogger Network:

Read more posts from the Ethical Writers Coalition:

Mark your calendars for Fashion Revolution Day!

fashion revolution day 2015

Fashion Revolution Day is almost here! Last year, conscientious consumers were encouraged to ask the question, "Who made your clothes?" as a way of getting others to rally around the cause of universal ethical labor practices. This year, we're asking, "Who made my clothes?" to the brands and companies we support. We want transparency across the board. One of the best ways to get involved is to wear your clothing inside out on April 24th, post a photo to social media, and tag the companies represented in your outfit, making sure to ask: "Who made my clothes?"

The Fashion Revolution Day team has a great set of materials for spreading the word available here. I've excerpted a few questions from an interview with founder, Carry Somers, below (full interview available for download here).

What is Fashion Revolution Day? 

Each year, Fashion Revolution will drive forward a different campaign to tackle some of the fashion industry’s most pressing issues. It will keep the most vulnerable in the supply chain in the public eye and challenge the industry to do better. It will also demonstrate that change is possible by showcasing examples of those who are already creating a better future for fashion.
Fashion Revolution Day, on 24 April, will rally the high street, the high end, the designers, the brands, the shoppers, the media, the commentators, the activists and everyone in between. After the impact achieved last year, Fashion Revolution Day is set to become a significant annual, global event.

Why this date? 

On 24 April 2013, 1133 people were killed when the Rana Plaza factory complex collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Many more were injured. Today, people are still suffering as a direct result of our fashion supply chain. Fashion Revolution Day says enough is enough. We need to show the world that change is possible.
fashion revolution day graphics

What are you trying to achieve? 

Fashion Revolution will become a catalyst for change through a number of routes. We want to raise awareness of the true cost of fashion and its impact at every stage in the process of production and consumption; show the world that change is possible through celebrating those involved in creating a more sustainable future; bring people together the length of the value chain to ask questions and share best practice; and work towards long-term industry-wide change, getting consensus from the entire supply chain around what changes need to happen.
This year, brands and retailers will be challenged to take responsibility for the individuals and communities on which their business depends. By taking an inside-out selfie, posting it on social media and asking the brand Who Made My Clothes? people around the world can show support for greater transparency throughout the fashion supply chain.
Much of the fashion industry is burying its head in the sand. Fashion Revolution is a global movement and we will bring the message straight from the cotton farmer, the mill dyer, the seamstress, the knitter, the weaver directly to the consumer, to show the truth, to show where change needs to happen, and how we, as consumers, can make a difference. For real change to happen, every part of the supply chain has to make a commitment to change, and that includes us.

What do you say to people who were horrified at the disaster, but can’t afford to pay extra for ethically–sourced clothing? 

We’re not asking people to boycott their favourite stores, we need to change the fashion industry from within. By asking the brands and retailers where we like to shop Who Made My Clothes? we can put pressure on them to be more transparent about their supply chains.
In terms of the price, three quarters of those questioned in a YouGov/Global Poverty Project survey said they would be likely to pay an extra 5% for their clothes if there was a guarantee workers were being paid fairly and working in safe conditions. It has been estimated that putting as little as 25p onto the cost of a garment made in Bangladesh would provide the producers with a living wage and pay for factories to meeting fire and building safety standards.

I hope you'll join me this year and ask, "Who made my clothes?"

  • Find local #fashrev events here
  • Spread the news on social media with the help of these resources
  • Pin and share the graphics on this post. 

fast fashion

#fairfashapril style challenge: join us!

#fairfashapril

Join the Ethical Blogger Network for an ethical style challenge on instagram!

On April 24,2013, Rana Plaza, a multi-story clothing manufacturing facility just outside Dhaka, Bangladesh, collapsed, killing 1,129 workers and injuring more. It is the deadliest garment factory disaster in history.

Fashion Revolution Day was launched shortly after as a way to both honor the victims of that terrible tragedy and to rally people to help change the global manufacturing industry for the better. The Ethical Blogger Network devised a fun style challenge as a way to spark conversation and share ethical resources. We think it's a great way to unite people under a shared goal of greater transparency and safer working conditions for workers worldwide.

Join us and follow along using the hashtag, #fairfashapril. Share with the greater Fashion Revolution Day community with hashtag, #fashrev.