Encircled

Ecofriendly Multi-Wear That's Never Boring: Why I Love Encircled

Encircled ecofriendly multiwear clothing review stylewise-blog.com
This post was sponsored by Encircled. Opinions and styling are my own.

To be honest, I've never loved the concept of multi-wear garments. I don't like puzzles and I don't like my clothes to be a puzzle, so all those buttons and twists and turns seemed exhausting.

But I think Encircled has made me change my mind, and here's why: the clothes are elegant, beautiful, and easy to wear. 

Encircled makes their clothing out of eco-friendly, naturally dyed Modal, Tencel, and Bamboo, soft, luscious fabrics that drape like a Grecian toga. They're made in an ethical facility in Canada. Many of their most popular products have a multi-wear element, but they also make classic tees, sweatpants, and leggings.

Ever up for a challenge, I chose to style two of their multi-wear items, the Chrysalis Cardi and the Revolve Dress II.
Encircled ecofriendly multiwear clothing review stylewise-blog.comEncircled ecofriendly multiwear clothing review stylewise-blog.com
Ethical Details: Chrysalis Cardi - c/o Encircled; Top and Culottes - thrifted; Slides - Swap.com

I chose the Chrysalis Cardi, shown here in Charcoal Gray, because I liked the idea of wearing it as a shrug.

In reality, it's not exactly a cardigan. It's cut like an oversized infinity scarf with several snaps around the edges and comes with a guide on how to turn it into different garments. This look takes one simple snap. Other looks, including dress and blouse styles, are a bit more complicated, but the How To Wear section on the site is a huge help.

This is really the perfect item for travel. When I road tripped to Florida over Winter Break, I managed to both overpack and not bring appropriate items for the weather. I wish I'd had the Chrysalis Cardi as an added warmth layer and to wear as a dress and long skirt. It would have saved me a lot of stress (not to mention room in my suitcase). I'll make sure to feature this a few different ways in the coming months, so stay tuned.
Encircled ecofriendly multiwear clothing review stylewise-blog.com Encircled ecofriendly multiwear clothing review stylewise-blog.com The Revolve Dress II in this stunning Sapphire (my birth stone!) is great because it's reversible. You can wear it with the cowl neck in the front or the back. I opted to wear it in the back for this look because I like how it drapes, almost like a cape. The hem and hip are slightly asymmetrical, which adds visual interest and makes it easier to drape for different looks (like if you want to wear it as a tunic instead of a dress).Encircled ecofriendly multiwear clothing review stylewise-blog.com
Ethical Details: Revolve Dress II - c/o Encircled; Shoes - Fortress of Inca; Earrings - Often Wander

While the weather's still cold, I'll be wearing this mostly as a tunic layered over jeans or leggings. But the length is perfectly appropriate to wear alone, and the color is so special I can easily wear this for special occasions.

The versatility of Encircled's product line is definitely a selling point, but it's important to me that things be truly wearable, as well. What I appreciate most about the garments I received for review is that the fabric is luxuriously soft but still substantial enough to hold up to regular wear. Plus, the colors are saturated and flattering.

Shop Encircled here


Follow on Social: Instagram | Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter

6 Places to Buy Well Made, Ethical Basics for Women (& Men)

6 places to buy well made ethical basics for women and men with Encircled
Sponsored Post. Contains affiliate links.

The terms ethical and artisan made are often synonymous with "novelty."

And that's not a bad thing. It's nice to own a one-of-a-kind embroidered dress, a bag made from leather off-cuts, and handwoven shoes. But unless you've really embraced your boho side, it's not particularly practical to outfit yourself exclusively in patterned and patch-worked goods.

I am a creature of comfort and versatility. My job has no dress code, but I prefer to wear cotton knits and easy pieces that pair well with simple accessories, the kind that won't get in the way when I'm unpacking a donation or reorganizing the sales floor.

So I've spent a lot of time seeking out ethically sourced, sustainable goods that fit well, last a long time, and fill the necessary category of "basics. The following brands use natural, breathable fabrics; feature styles that work in many contexts; and cater toward someone who wants a good fit without too much fuss.

6 PLACES TO BUY WELL MADE, ETHICAL BASICS

Encircled and Dorsu

1. Encircled

What They Carry: Made in Toronto, Canada, Encircled specializes in multi-wear, classic clothing in eco-friendly jersey fabrics that fit a wide variety of body types and sizes.
Who: Women (+ 1 Men's Item)
Price Point: $18-248
My Picks: Chrysalis Cardi, Revolve Dress II (I'll be reviewing these items soon)

2. Dorsu

What They Carry: Made in Cambodia, Dorsu uses soft cotton factory remnants to produce their range of classic tees, dresses, and skirt. (Dorsu will be offering more affordable US shipping later this year.)
Who: Women & Men
Price Point: $20-60 AUD ($15-48 USD)
My Picks: Slip Dress

American Giant and Everlane

3. American Giant

What They Carry: Made in the USA, American Giant makes t-shirts, leggings, and hoodies in soft cotton.
Who: Women & Men
Price Point: $24.50-200
My Picks: Classic U-neck

4. Everlane

What They Carry: Transparently produced in a number of countries, Everlane makes minimalist basics in cotton, silk, cashmere, and technical fabrics.
Who: Women & Men
Price Point: $15-300
My Picks: Cotton Long Sleeve Crew

Pact Apparel and Fair Indigo

5. PACT

What They Carry: PACT carries organic cotton, fair trade underwear, socks, t-shirts, and leggings.
Who: Women, Men, & Kids
Price Point: $10-45
My Picks: Organic Leggings

6. Fair Indigo

What They Carry: Fair Indigo carries fair trade, organic originals, many in soft and sturdy Pima cotton.
Who: Women & Men
Price Point: $25-100
My Picks: Organic Tie Dress


First photo by Yoann Boyer on Unsplash