ethical

5 Innovations That Make Ethical Shopping Easier


Over the past year, the ethical community has (thankfully) started to organize itself in a way that makes it abundantly easier to shop for stylish, affordable goods that are sourced responsibly. When I started writing about conscious consumerism in late 2012, I remember looking far and wide for ethical things that fit my sense of style and being largely disappointed. I fumbled around for awhile trying to regroup, often settling for good enough instead of items that expressed who I wanted to be sartorially.

No more! Not only are there hundreds of ethical brands, you can actually find them! While Instagram is a great place to start, it can be time consuming and people don't always use hashtags appropriately. Luckily, there are a few, more sophisticated options that lower the threshold to entering the ethical fashion movement.

They come in many forms, but they all accomplish one thing: make shopping easier so we can all work together to make life better.

5 ETHICAL SHOPPING INNOVATIONS



1. Project JUST

RESOURCE

With no information, consumers continue to buy fast fashion; incentives stay misaligned; more fast fashion is made; abuses continue. Informed and empowered consumers have the power to transform the fashion industry to an ethical and sustainable one with each purchase.

Project JUST began with one goal in mind: to give consumers access to the information they need to make a better choice. From defining jargon to giving thorough sourcing information for around a hundred prominent brands, Project JUST is a great place to learn about the conscious consumer movement and figure out more about the common brands you love.

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2. Good On You

RESOURCE

We want to create a world where consumers’ choices drive businesses to be sustainable and fair. We know there are millions of consumers around the world who share our goal.

Australia-based Good On You is an app and website dedicated to parsing out the ethical details of as many brands as possible. They employ hundreds of volunteer researchers and try to add a few new brands every week, in addition to writing 2-3 informative blog posts. I particularly like their roundups on types of clothing, like denim and activewear.

Good On You is expanding to North America as soon as they get the funding! Click here to support their campaign.

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3. Done Good

RESOURCE

These are the underdogs, going up against the big guys, determined to prove you can build a successful business that makes the world better at the same time. We want them to succeed. The world needs them to succeed! 
That’s why we do what we do. To help people looking for the unique, the simple, the natural, the good. To support companies with purpose.

Just launched, Done Good is a Browser Extension that alerts you whenever you're on a page that contains an ethical product. They'll also give you exclusive discount codes for ethical companies when they're available.

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4. The Rescued Collection

SHOP

The average American tosses 82 pounds of textile waste each year, which adds up to 11 million tons of trash in landfills! Our Rescued Collection saves pre-loved ethical items from this fate with a carefully curated selection of vegan fashions. 

Ethical fashion retailer, Bead & Reel, just launched their ethical consignment store and I'm pumped! I've found that once I have the opportunity to wear or use an ethical item, I can justify the expense. But it's hard to pull the trigger on high priced, ethically sourced goods online when you can't thoroughly inspect the item for quality and longevity. By offering gently used goods at a lower price point, you can buy it and see if it works for you, and then maybe invest in the brand at full price further down the road.

Learn how to sell here. Note: vegan, organic items only.

The above link is an affiliate link.

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5. SLOWRE

SHOP

SLOWRE (pronounced "slower") = fashion, slower // pre-loved, modern, responsible style; the antidote to fast fashion.
SLOWRE sells and consigns women's clothing, shoes & accessories by independent designers & brands that primarily produce in the US, provide supply chain transparency, use vegan materials, source eco-friendly fabrics, and/or engage in other responsible business practices.

Founded by blogger, Grechen of Grechen's Closet, SLOWRE offers gently used goods from ethical, domestically produced, and small designer labels. The concept is similar to The Rescued Collection, but goods do not have to be vegan and the aesthetic leans more toward edgy minimal. I bought an Everlane dress from SLOWRE and it arrived like-new.

Learn how to sell here.

Each time I shop, I use a combination of the above resources to find the best option. I prefer to buy secondhand when possible, so it's a bonus if I can buy an ethically sourced item from an ethical retailer. Smart, easy-to-use resources are the key to gaining more traction in this industry, so I'm glad I can rely on the research, expertise, and curation of others to keep the momentum going.

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Did I miss a resource? Let me know in the comments.


Photo Credit: Bead & Reel, graphic added by me

Ethical Giveaway: American-made Denim & Leather Clutch from Hem + Haw

Hem + Haw Conroy Clutch ethical giveaway, made in USA
This post was produced in partnership with Hem + Haw.

When Hope, founder of new domestically produced purse line Hem + Haw, initially reached out to me, she had no idea we shared the Charlottesville connection. It amazes and sort of baffles me how many people in the ethical consumerism space have lived for a time in Charlottesville. I'm grateful to be able to live in a relatively small town with all these interconnected, well traveled people. It makes it a heck of a lot easier to feel like you're a part of something, and to challenge yourself to be the best you can be.

Anyway, Hope lived here for several years while working for a local marketing agency, but she recently took a leap of faith to become a small part of the American manufacturing revival by producing high end clutches and purses with upcyled denim and American-sourced, new materials. In her words:

Here’s the thing that’s true about a good pair of jeans—they hang in there. It’s part of why we love them. We’ve worked to make our designs nimble, to maximize the material in a single pair of jeans as well as make use of the wide variety of washes available. 
Having seen firsthand what happens in communities when economic livelihoods disappear, we’re committed to U.S. manufacturing. We’ve sourced materials from all over the country and learned from a variety of local craftsman. We’re pretty thrilled that Hem + Haw bags have have been put together by hands that have been working in their respective fields for years.

Now Hope lives in Louisiana, but I had the chance to meet her at the Hem + Haw Launch Party she threw in downtown Charlottesville a couple months ago. Hope is one of those people who greets you like you're an old friend, and she's truly passionate about ensuring that every component of the line is traceable. She's also worked hard to ensure that the profit margin on each product is fair (a subject we ethical marketers and writers don't talk about enough, in my opinion).

The Goods...

Hem + Haw Conroy Clutch ethical giveaway, made in USA


Hem + Haw currently offers a mini collection of denim and leather clutches and convertible bags, available on their website. Today, they've offered to give away one Conroy Clutch in the color of your choice to a StyleWise reader, just in time for the Holidays.

The Conroy Clutch, valued at $95.00, is made from upcycled denim, American-made vegetable tanned leather and cotton, and Charlottesville-made antique brass hardware. Keep it for yourself or give it as a gift. Either way, you'll have a good story to tell about where the item came from and how it was made.

Hem + Haw Conroy Clutch ethical giveaway, made in USA

This giveaway will end on Tuesday, December 6th at 11:59 pm EST. By entering through the form below, you agree to allow Hem + Haw to add you to their email list. Open to US readers only. 


a Rafflecopter giveaway

If Only In My Dreams: A Late Fall Splurge List

November List - ethical wishlist

Sometimes you just want to look at pretty things. 


With cold weather finally settling in over Charlottesville, I've turned my thoughts to things that are warm, versatile, and easy to layer. I normally try to create lists that are right in the comfort zone of my budget, but this month, I just want to dream a little - and celebrate good, ethical design based on design and function without worrying so much about price point.

That being said, there are certainly a few affordable options in this list, and some things - like that winter coat - that would work themselves out with cost-per-wear over time.

This list contains affiliate links.

MY WINTER SPLURGE LIST:

1. Axiology Lipstick in Elusive, $28.00

Rad '90s orange red that also hearkens the '70s, two eras that have come back in full force this season.

2. Kendra Cable Knit Sweater, $228.00

Classic, thick, and warm.

3. Kings of Indigo Juno Skinny, $168.00

I am really digging a more classic cut that isn't quite as tight at the ankles, and the mid rise is much more comfortable for all day wear.

4. Komodo Egea Coat, $249.99

Just stunning, and the lack of lapel feels modern.

5. Fair Indigo Alpaca Scarf, $49.90

I loooove alpaca to an unhealthy degree, plus its sustainable and cruelty free.

6. Dorsu Long Sleeved Top, $24.99

A great basic for layering.

7. Fair Indigo Top, $42.90

The berry color is seasonally appropriate and the fit and design look versatile. Dress it up or dress it down.

8. VEJA Esplar Velcro Sneaker, $135.00

I don't know why I like these, but the black leather is cool and the velcro is appealing. I hate having to lace up my shoes in the morning.

9. Fair Indigo Keyhole Dress, $75.90

Pretty color and a classic, feminine silhouette.

10. Bhava Coco Wedge Bootie, $199.00

A low, walkable wedge that would pair with anything.


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Just a note: I'm grieving over the implications of this week's Presidential election. Though I hadn't been without fear during the last year or so of campaigning, I was still holding out hope that this country was smart enough - and compassionate enough - to refuse to ignore Trump's lies and look past his insults. I was wrong. Reeling from the aftermath, praying for the future, and trying to figure out the best way forward. For now, I'm just trying to be as kind and attentive as I can to the needs of others, especially refugees, immigrants, Muslims, African Americans, Latinos, women, and every other group Trump's policies target. If you want to talk about it with me, please feel free to reach out at stylewiseblog@gmail.com.

#ConsciousLiving: Snapshots and Thoughts from our Kentucky-Ohio Roadtrip

Clifton Gorge in Ohio

Last week, Daniel and I drove 7 hours to Nazareth, Kentucky to attend the annual Kentucky Council of Churches conference at the Sisters of Charity Convent and Retreat Center. You may be thinking: "Why would two Virginians go to a conference tailored to Kentuckians?" Well, I've sort of been keeping a secret for the last year.

I was asked to give back-to-back workshops on Conscious Consumerism! This year's theme was Justice and, while most of the sessions were, quite appropriately, on racial justice and reconciliation, they wanted to include a section on "lifestyle justice," as well. I tailored my talk around a uniquely Christian perspective on what it means to consume ethically, making sure to prioritize empathy, prayer, and meditation. While it matters what we consume, it also matters why we're consuming, and how that dependency on consumption affects us emotionally and spiritually. Right action is good, but it's better if it stems from a change of heart. I used this quote by Doug Frank (read the whole interview - it's great) in the presentation to drive home that point:
If you’ve got a rage for the good, as I did, then shifting your focus from personal morality to social morality doesn’t make you any less of a narrow-minded legalist. Instead of trying to be good enough by not dancing, drinking, lying, or cheating, you’re trying to be good enough according to the standards of social progressivism. It’s still a very tiring treadmill.
Clifton Gorge in Ohio
Daniel and my parents hiking at Clifton Gorge
Speaker on Ethical Consumerism and Fair Trade, Leah Wise
Looking totes profesh at the conference

I identify very strongly with the tiring treadmill of trying to be enough. It's become a huge goal of mine to do the right things out of a deeper calling than just "How do I make people think I'm good? How do I convince myself I'm good?" I believe that, for those raised with a Christian world view in particular, it's vital that we confront that insecurity before we can really make healthy choices. So, while the talk included particular definitions, models, and ethical companies, it was really about taking a hard inward look and growing from there. If anyone wants a copy of the slideshow, I can send it over. Just email me or leave your email in the comments. I don't think the whole thing was recorded, so you'll miss all my antics. Sorry about that. 

wildflowers, Clifton Gorge in Ohio
Wildflowers at Clifton Gorge
Stillhouse at Heaven Hill
The Stillhouse at Heaven Hill
Bubbling Bourbon, Maker's Mark
Yeasty pre-bourbon
 
We realized a few days before our trip that were would be right in the middle of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, so we spent a day and a half after the conference ended touring distilleries. I'm not a huge fan of bourbon - though I certainly like it more after several tastings - but I LOVE learning. Bourbon is a truly American product with a long, humorous, sometimes harrowing history, and our tour guides at Heaven Hill, Maker's Mark, and Bulleit were extremely knowledgeable. I liked the dark, quiet, spookiness of the stillhouses, too. If you ever want to know about the history of bourbon, I am happy to talk your ear off, but I'll leave you with just one fun fact for now:

For bourbon to be classified as bourbon by the US government, it must be aged in a new, charred oak barrel. While this might seem wasteful at first, the barrel actually gets to take a lively journey around the world, adding warmth and spice to several other aged liquors. After 6-20 years of aging bourbon, barrels are sent to Scotland and used for scotch. Once the aging process is complete there, they're sent to Mexico to age tequila. And finally, nearly 80 years later (if all goes as planned), they'll be sent to the Tropics to age rum. What a life!

Mums
Mums
the tree with the lights in it, louisville, kentucky
"The Tree with the Lights in it" in Louisville, KY
An explanation of the above caption and my final scattered thought for this post, a quote from Annie Dillard's Pilgrim at Tinker Creek:
It was for this tree I searched through the peach orchards of summer, in the forests of fall and down winter and spring for years. Then one day I was walking along Tinker creek and thinking of nothing at all and I saw the tree with the lights in it. I saw the backyard cedar where the mourning doves roost charged and transfigured, each cell buzzing with flame. I stood on the grass with the lights in it, grass that was wholly fire, utterly focused and utterly dreamed. It was less like seeing than like being for the first time seen, knocked breathless by a powerful glance. The flood of fire abated, but I’m still spending the power. Gradually the lights went out in the cedar, the colors died, the cells un-flamed and disappeared. I was still ringing. I had been my whole life a bell and never knew it until at that moment I was lifted and struck. I have since only very rarely seen the tree with the lights in it. The vision comes and goes, mostly goes, but I live for it, for the moment the mountains open and a new light roars in spate through the crack, and the mountains slam.

EWC Zero Waste Challenge: Paying Attention Counts for Something

zero waste challenge

This week of the Zero Waste Challenge was harder and easier at the same time. I know that doesn't make sense, but here's why. On the one hand, there were some unavoidable trash moments because I attended both an open house through my work and a launch party for new business, Hem and Haw. Where finger food is, you'll almost inevitably find disposable plates and cups and obviously I wanted to eat, drink, and be merry, so I used a couple of cups and a paper plate.

On the other hand, I think I've come up with a long term strategy for reducing my waste.

It's called paying attention


I'll totally overwhelm myself if I cut everything out at once, but several of you have suggested some easy alternatives to things I wasn't sure I could let go of:

  • I currently use cotton balls to apply toner at night. This week, I opted to tear them in half to reduce waste. As soon as I'm out, I'll switch to a crochet ball variety that can we washed and re-used (I previously purchased cotton pads for this purpose, but they weren't absorbent enough). I'll either purchase from an etsy seller or beg my mom to make some for me. 
  • There are some produce items and food that don't really need to be sealed shut in the refrigerator. As Teresa suggested, I will dedicate a plate or container to half-used onions and cover leftovers with a ceramic plate instead of wrapping everything in plastic wrap. I think I'll also try to stock up/save wide mouth jars, as Eimear suggested, to store bulk items and leftovers.
  • At home and at work, I use too many paper towels. As Rebekah suggested, I'll grab some unsellable donations from the shop to cut into rags for cleaning and make sure to put a towel in the bathroom at work for employees to dry their hands off with. 

Did I manage to stay abreast of any of these zero waste innovations this week? No, unfortunately. When things get busy, I start to forget that I'm supposed to be reducing personal waste. I've decided to be gracious with myself but move forward with achievable goals. 

I didn't keep a proper tally of my waste this week, but it's fair to say I used several paper towels, toilet paper, and a few cotton balls. Additionally, there was one unavoidable straw and napkin at a restaurant, a couple of plastic cups, and a cardboard frozen dinner carton.

The good news is that I triumphantly avoided a disposable cup at the coffee shop this morning! I had to catch the barista quick before he made my cafe au lait.

What I've Learned:

Generally, I've approached this challenge the way I approach food. I eat mostly vegetarian/pescatarian at home, but I won't put on a dramatic monologue and refuse "unacceptable" food when it's offered to me at parties and people's homes. In the same way, if a server puts a straw in my drink, I'm not going to throw a tantrum. 

I make the choice when I have the choice to make, but I don't want to harass people or shame them. Ultimately, reducing waste must be a collective, systematic goal. We need to change our food and manufacturing systems, prioritize local and bulk options to reduce packaging, and make the long term effects of trash more apparent. Honestly, we should probably live closer to landfills. It would help to see that it doesn't just go away after we've tossed it.

Additional Reading/Viewing:



Check out the triumphs and struggles of other members of the Ethical Writers Coalition on their blogs:

The Moral Wardrobe: Ethical Fashion is Not the New Black

A Beautiful Refuge Ethical Fashion TeeA Beautiful Refuge Ethical Fashion TeeEtiko Fair Trade Converse High TopsEthical Fashion is NOT the new black
Ethical Details: Tee - A Beautiful Refuge; Purse - c/o FashionABLE; Sneakers - Etiko; Ring - Alex & Ani

I got this t-shirt way back in May when A Beautiful Refuge premiered its very first line of graphic tees and totes. My friend, Hannah, of Life Style Justice and members of the Ethical Blogger Network teamed up to raise funds for this new social enterprise that benefits marginalized women in the Philippines while providing well made, ethically sourced goods for conscious consumer geeks and anyone else who likes inspiring messages.

The shirt reads: 

Ethical fashion is not the new black. It's Article 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


It's a necessary reminder, I think. While it's freaking amazing that ethical manufacturing and social enterprises are in right now, it's imperative that it's not seen as a short term trend to be tried and forgotten when next season's trends come around. Ethical fashion should be a given. 

I paired the tee with my new-to-me Etiko fair trade, sustainable sneakers, which I purchased on ebay. They're just as comfortable as Converse, which is to say that there's a bit of a break in period. I love the look, though. I've always been a high tops lover.

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A Beautiful Refuge is having a big sale right now to generate more cashflow for the benefit of their partner organization, Safe Refuge, which provides essentials to women in need. 

Shop A Beautiful Refuge here.

EWC Zero Waste Challenge: Introduction + Days 1-2

zero waste challenge with the ethical writers coalition
Graphic by Elizabeth Stilwell

After a lively conversation about how difficult it is to go zero waste without losing friends and being mean to service workers (this may be an exaggeration, but it's awfully hard to say no to paper and plastic items when you're not totally in control of your shopping and eating), me and a handful of other members of the Ethical Writers Coalition decided to take on a 2 week long Zero Waste Challenge.

Here are the guidelines:

  1. Baseline is not sending anything to the landfill.
  2. As long as you can (responsibly) recycle it or compost it, it doesn't count as waste.
  3. You have to verify that the items you put in your recycling or compost bins are actually recyclable.
  4. You must document how much waste you produce and why, honestly.
  5. Waste produced on your behalf at restaurants and other public places counts as your waste, too.

For the first couple of days, instead of actively going zero waste, I decided to carefully monitor my normal habits at home. Since I'd already purchased food and kitchen implements that produce waste, I used what I had. For simplicity's sake, I'll just be listing the waste I produced.

Saturday

  • Coffee filter
  • Pre-packaged spinach bag
  • Plastic produce bag containing cucumber
  • Plastic wrap and styrofoam tray from mini red potatoes packaging
  • Cotton ball 
  • Toilet paper
  • 3 paper towels
  • Pre-packaged snack cake plastic
  • 3 pieces of chocolate wrapped in foil (recyclable, but I forgot to put them in recycling bin)
  • Onion skin (compostable, but I didn't compost it)

Sunday

  • Coffee filter
  • Pre-packaged lasagna with plastic wrap and soiled cardboard (not recyclable)
  • Banana peel (compostable, but I didn't compost it)
  • Tea bag (compostable, but didn't compost it)
  • Napkins used at restaurant
  • Cotton ball
  • Toilet paper
  • 2 paper towels

What I learned so far:

The saddest thing on this list are the items I could have composted or recycled that I just didn't think about. My local farmer's market has a communal compost bin, but I'm afraid they'll be closing up for the fall pretty soon, so I'll need to examine better ways to compost (plus, I hardly ever make it to the farmer's market - Saturdays are for sleeping in!).

I should also note that I chose potatoes wrapped in plastic over the alternative because they were the only mini russet potatoes available and they looked fresher than the unpackaged, full sized variety. I really need to get myself some reusable produce bags, though (I'm going to do that today!).

I just ordered a pour-over coffee kit with a reusable filter with birthday money from my mother-in-law (thanks, Kathy!), so that will take care of my coffee filter usage longterm (I'm excited about finding daily rituals to force me out of bed when the mornings are dark, so I'm also thinking this pour-over switch will help with my mental health through the winter months).

I never use straws anymore, so I avoided that issue altogether when I ate out Sunday night.

Shopping List:

  • Reusable Cotton Balls (I have pads, but they don't absorb toner very well)
  • Reusable Produce Bags
  • Composting setup

I'll post again in a few days!


If you'd like to participate in this challenge with the Ethical Writers Coalition, just make sure to tag us (#ethicalwritersco and @ethicalwriters + #ewczerowastechallenge) on social media!


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See why I'm trying to go Zero Waste here.

Ethical Fall Favorites: A Virtual Capsule

Ethical Fall Capsule Wardrobe
This post contains affiliate links.

It's taken me 4 years, but this former Floridian actually looks forward to cool weather now. I joke that I'm a reptile - I need to warm up in the sun before starting my day - but fall really does hold a bit of magic no other season holds. Maybe it's the startling, bright, liveliness of things dying: all the tactile, sensory delights of crackling leaves and crisp air and seeing your breath as you exhale.

I'm also going into this season with a refreshing clarity around what I like, what I "need," and what works with what I've already got. It's taken nearly 4 years of being a more conscientious consumer to get to this point, so I'm ready to mix things up and get full use out of my fall closet.


SILHOUETTES AND PRODUCTS I'M EXCITED ABOUT...

Everlane Luxe Wool Sweater in Oxblood


I purchased this sweater (in a size Medium) and it's just perfect for early fall. Lightweight, slightly form fitting, in a lovely brown-red oxblood that I love.

Prana London Jeans


I'm fortunate to already have my denim wardrobe squared away for the fall, having purchased a few pairs 2 years ago that have held up quite well (I re-dyed some with indigo last week and they turned out great!). If I needed new denim, though, I would consider Prana's line of classic cuts in classic colors.

People Tree Crystal Dot Pendant


I'm addicted to simple, minimalist jewelry that adds just the right touch to an outfit. I like the lariat style on this natural stone, handmade necklace.

Housgoods Rill Ring


A simple little ring to stack and pair with other rings in my growing collection. I didn't like wearing rings when I was in school because they always hit against my pens uncomfortably as I took notes, but now that I am free from the burden of note-taking, I've found that I like the simple statement they make.

Amour Vert Paola High-Low Tee in Tandoori


I bought this tee in early September as soon as the Tandoori color became available. I LOVE it. This is the color of the season for me, and the high-low cut feels very contemporary.

Prim Botanicals Organic Botanical Lip Sheen in Pretty Perfect


This lip sheen is nearly the same color as the Amour Vert tee so, naturally, it's my favorite. I'm getting back into tinted lip balms and glosses this season. It's nice to add some color as the world gets more monotone.

Sseko Designs Black Suede Loafers


I bought these last winter, but I'm looking forward to wearing them more frequently this season. They're super comfortable and pair well with casual and more formal outfits.

Etiko Organic Fair Trade High Tops


I grew up wearing Converse high tops, but the pair I had in high school (pink patchwork!) is no longer with me, so I was so pleased to find fair trade sneakers that fit the bill. I'm planning on wearing these with everything.

Komodo Liana Wool Boucle Dress


I am really into the idea of layering tops under tank dresses and pinafores this fall, both to get more use out of my summer favorites and to add some versatility and creativity to my wardrobe. I love the color and length of this pinafore, and it looks great layered with a turtleneck. I'm a bit self conscious that turtlenecks make my neck look big, but I'm trying to get over it, so maybe I can convince myself into it with cute styling.

The Moral Wardrobe: As Fate Would Have It

Ethical Details: Top - thrifted; Necklace - FashionABLE*; Shoes - old; Skirt - LuLaRoe

So, as fate would have it, the very week I posted my Buyer Be Wary post about Direct Sales schemes, one of my friends started down the course of quitting her day job to become a LuLaRoe Direct Sales representative. Still Being Molly covers LuLaRoe's ethical premise thoroughly, so I won't add anything to it (though I'm not quite convinced). 

Anyway, of course I got caught up in the excitement and made a purchase. That's the weird thing about ethics in action. At the systemic or institutional level, I don't buy it. I don't think direct sales is generally a good idea. I don't even think selling LuLaRoe is generally a good idea. But I want to see my friend thrive, so I made a purchase. I shrug my shoulders and I keep on keepin' on. I think it's important - vital even - to call attention to broad issues while being aware that, in reality, we have to weigh a variety of potential outcomes every time we make a moral decision. It's not cut and dried.

I wore this outfit to the best wedding ever and the fringe and twirly skirt were amazing on the dance floor (you may not know this about me, but I am a wedding dancing fiend). Great for polka dancing, especially!

Three Prayers for Workers in the Global Supply Chain

ethical fashion and christianity

Tonight I had the opportunity to give a talk on ethical fashion and Christianity for the college group associated with my church. It was a good opportunity to hone my sense of why this type of advocacy matters within a Christian context, and how I can best relate it back to traditional Biblical texts and narratives. 

At the end of the discussion, we broke into three groups and wrote prayers inspired by traditional Anglican prayer forms as a way of engaging more deeply with the reality of our inter-connectedness with workers across the supply chain and to provide a starting point for daily meditations on conscious consumerism. I am really inspired by what they came up with, and I want to share these prayers in case they may be useful to you in your personal meditations and reflections. 

As I mentioned on Instagram earlier today, I think there's an unnecessary divide between the "spiritual" folks (read: hippies) and the "religious" folks (read: fundamentalists) in the ethical living space. Instead of making negative assumptions about how people's beliefs inform their ethical practice, or lack thereof, I'd rather jump right in and help inform interpretation so that all of our actions can be grounded in both compassion-oriented belief and our more tangible experiences of injustice in the world.

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Three Anglican Prayers for Workers in the Global Supply Chain


God of compassion and creation,

Bless the hands who have made
our jeans, shirts, and jackets,

Help us to remember that these
hands and these people are part of
the Body of Christ.

Be with the men, women, and children
who spend more of their lives
making our clothes than we spend
wearing them.

We lament those whose lives have been taken
For the sake of production.

May we be moved to action.
To spread awareness. To be thoughtful
in our purchases. To have compassion
for neighbors no matter how
far away.

Amen.

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God of justice,

You call us to be a neighbor to all,
Help us to acknowledge the toil that
laborers around the world face.

Watch over those who labor in unsafe
working conditions,
Help us remain aware of the realities
facing people who make our clothes
and be conscious of our consumption.

Be with policymakers as they make
decisions that impact these people’s lives.

We ask that you bless the hands that
come into contact with our clothes – production
to possession. Give us courage to
recognize our privilege and make
change in our own lives.

Remind us that we are all made in
your image.

Amen.

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O God,
Creator of all people and things,

Be with your people in the global supply chain,
who you created in your likeness and
whose work contributes to our comfort.

Give us the courage to fight against
systems of oppression,
and help us raise up the voices of
the oppressed, who already have
the right and the power to
speak for themselves.

Keep us ever mindful of
the inextricable link between us.

We ask these things
in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord,
whose first disciples were marginalized
wage workers,

Amen.

Small Steps Toward Zero Waste Living

Zero waste living tips and climate change discussion


As I've learned more about the long term environmental consequences of over consumption in the clothing industry - from carbon emissions that contribute to catastrophic climate change to polyester fibers entering our oceans - I've simultaneously started bumping up against similar issues in my everyday consumption of hygiene products, toiletries, and food.

I'm ashamed to admit it now, but as a teenager I had this weird compulsion to leave just a little little bit of shampoo, lotion, and other liquid toiletries in their containers when I tossed them into the trash (strike two is that I rarely thought to take the bottle down from my bathroom to the recycling bin). That type of behavior was wasteful and unthinking no matter how you look at it. I'm training myself out of it, trying to remember to add a little water to the solution to get every last drop and always recycling my containers.

And, while I'm not fully on board with the Marie Kondo minimalism trend, I think we can take an important lesson from all this clearing out and wasting not hype: 

Reducing our consumption in small and big ways matters.


Every single thing we consume must be created from raw materials, produced or processed in a factory, and shipped to us from who-knows-where. All of this takes energy. And then when we're done consuming the product, whatever it may be, we're left with plastic bottles and wrap, paper packaging and single use containers. 

This isn't just about the environment - though I think at this stage, when climate scientists say we're experiencing the hottest year on record and it's too late to correct course, we must start seeing the environment as more than an object for our use. This is about ecosystems and animals and people, and it's about the entire system working correctly to biodegrade waste, filter the air, and bring us nutrient rich food.

While I suspect I'm preaching to the choir here, I want to reiterate that caring about the environment and "believing" in global warming (i.e. taking the evidence collected and analysis of trained scientists seriously) is not a political issue. It is a "I don't want everything I love about this planet to suffer" issue, and I think we can agree on that. Making personal changes won't change everything - we need to elect leaders who will take renewable energy and other forms of pollution reduction seriously (ahem, and caring about clean water for Indigenous peoples - sign the petition here), but we can start somewhere.

I'm also well aware of the fact that choosing sustainable options is often a matter of class and privilege. For one, having the time and money to discern between products and lifestyle habits isn't always possible, and there are lots of towns and neighborhoods that simply don't have infrastructures that assist in living a more environmentally friendly life. If everything at your grocery store is wrapped in plastic, you can't immediately do anything about it, but perhaps over time you can help influence store and local policies on plastic waste.

That being said...

This fall, in addition to being an aware and active citizen, I'm ready to take the leap to a zero waste lifestyle. It won't come all at once, and I don't anticipate being entirely zero waste for a very long time, but I can continue to make small changes that add up. 


I've already switched to cloth menstrual pads and it's been an amazing, practical, easy experience overall. I don't buy plastic water bottles. I've also stopped using as much plastic wrap to cover leftovers, instead covering my ceramic bowls with small plates to keep out any dust and debris in the fridge. I use cold water when I wash my face instead of waiting for the hot water heater to do its job, thereby reducing my water usage. And I buy lots of my toiletries in bulk to reduce overall packaging waste. At the suggestion of a reader, I'm being more mindful about how much and what type of packaging ethical companies use to ship their products, too.

But there's plenty more I can do. I learned a lot from my friend Holly's recent video about her Zero Waste Sustainable Switches, so I encourage you to watch it below...





Have you reduced waste in other ways? I could use some more suggestions! It's easy to overlook things.

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If you found this post useful, perhaps you'd like to:

The Moral Wardrobe: Perfect Pairings

Victoria Road tunic and Sseko Designs outfit - ethical outfitVictoria Road tunic and Sseko Designs outfit - ethical outfitthrifted straw hatVictoria Road tunic and Sseko Designs outfit - ethical outfit Ethical Details: Tunic - c/o Victoria Road (also worn here, on sale now); Hat - thrifted; Bracelet - c/o Candorra Artisans; Sandals - Sseko Designs; Jeans - old

I bought this hat at a Goodwill in LA for $4.00 and it's definitely one of those surprise finds I'll cherish for years. It came in handy during our sunny hike up to Point Dume, too. When I travel, the only souvenir I buy is something from a local thrift shop. It's low cost, reminds me of the place I visited, and tends to be more practical than a keychain with palm trees on it or whatever other nonsense thing they've created to feed our nostalgia.

I really love this outfit. It's amazing how much it feels like me while embodying something a little more even keeled, a little more mature, than how I typically see myself. Sophisticated but not stuffy. As I approach year 28, I think that's how I'd like to be described. 

DIY: Transitioning Your Summer Wardobe Into Fall with Tea Dye

DIY ombre tea dye tutorial
Thanks to Numi Organic Tea for sponsoring this post.

I don't buy the old style rule about not wearing white after Labor Day, but I do like to bring warm fall tones into my wardrobe as the weather cools down. I had a white off-the-shoulder top that wasn't getting much use in my summer rotation, so I decided it would be the perfect test subject for a DIY ombre dye experiment.

Traditional textile dyes can be hazardous to your health and irritate sensitive skin, so I started hunting around for examples of natural dye alternatives, and ultimately decided to brew up my own concoction using a blend of Rooibos, Black, and Turmeric teas. The blend of Rooibos and Turmeric proved to be a winning combination, bringing in tones of blush and mustard, both big hits for fall, while the black tea provided a base tone to ensure proper color saturation. Read on to make your own ombre top...

dye your clothes with tea

WHAT YOU'LL NEED:

  • Stock Pot
  • Tap Water
  • 15 Black Tea Bags, 15 Numi Rooibos Tea Bags, 4 Numi Turmeric Tea Bags, with all tags removed
  • White or Cream Natural Fabric Textiles (I used a white cotton top)
  • White Vinegar
  • Hanger
  • Stove Top
  • Timer
  • Test fabric (optional, but useful if you want to be sure that the end result won't surprise you)

how to dye with tea, featuring Numi Organic Rooibos and Turmericombre dyed t-shirt

THE PROCESS:

  1. Fill a stock pot halfway with regular tap water. Place on stovetop and heat until boiling.
  2. Take all the hang tags off of 15 Rooibos tea bags, 15 black tea bags, and 4 Turmeric tea bags.
  3. Once water is boiling, add tea bags to the pot. Simmer and steep for 10-15 minutes. 
  4. While tea is steeping, visualize your garment in 3 sections. You will need to keep these sections in mind as you dip dye to achieve a noticeable ombre effect.
  5. Run your garment under cool tap water, then wring out the excess moisture before placing in dye bath.
  6. Turn off heat. Do not remove tea bags. 
  7. Clip the shoulders of your damp garment to a hanger for easier maneuvering, then submerge garment to highest point you want dyed (I left a small portion near the top of my garment white). Immediately remove the top third of the garment for a light wash of color. This will be the lightest section.
  8. Make sure the rest of your garment is aligned as straight as possible with surface of the dye bath to get an even ombre effect. Set your timer for 15 minutes and let the bottom 2/3 steep.
  9. After 15 minutes, remove the middle third of your garment from the dye bath. Make sure the bottom third is still completely submerged, then let steep for an hour or more. At this point, I took my stock pot off of the now cool burner and placed it outside in direct sun to keep the dye bath warm. 
  10. After one hour, remove your garment and see if desired effect has been achieved. If not, continue steeping. 
  11. Once you are ready, remove your garment, rinse lightly under cool, running water, then place in a clean pot comprised of 1/2 cool water and 1/2 white vinegar. This will help seal the dye. 
  12. Rinse through once more, then let your garment dry.
  13. Wash sparingly to maintain dye saturation.

THE RESULT:

DIY ombre tea dyed off the shoulder top
Before and After
DIY ombre tea dyed off the shoulder top DIY ombre tea dyed off the shoulder top

As you can see, the rinsed and dried garment will be considerably lighter in color than it appeared while still saturated in tea. Keep that in mind and steep longer if you want a darker effect. I love this pretty yellow and blush-tan ombre and I think it suits my complexion better than the original top.

Have you dyed with tea or other natural dyes? I'm trying out indigo next!

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See my other collaborations with Numi here.


Giveaway: $100 Abrazo Style Gift Card

abrazo style mexican embroidered dress giveaway

As I mentioned in yesterday's review, Abrazo Style makes ethical, handmade pieces inspired and created by Mexican artisans. The Lilia Dress I own shows care and craftsmanship, from its subtle, asymmetrical hemline to the way it skims over my hips. And the embroidery, of course, is really well done.

In light of the fact that this style of garment is increasingly popular, it's especially important to know that the artisans received a living wage and work in an environment where they receive respect. You may be able to find similar pieces in markets throughout the southern United States and in Mexico, but there's a high likelihood that the people who made them were not compensated fairly. Abrazo Style ensures this, and their custom designs intended to flatter and fit makes them stand out.

I'm excited to announce that Abrazo Style is giving away a $100 Gift Card to one StyleWise Reader. The giveaway will run through Wednesday, June 22 at midnight.

Enter to win by following the prompts below! Good luck!


  fair trade clothing giveaway abrazo style

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Shop Abrazo Style here.


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The Moral Wardrobe: Victoria Road's Medallion Split Collar Tunic

victoria road ethical medallion tunic review

As a part of our collaboration, Victoria Road sent me the soft-as-silk Medallion Split Collar Tunic to review. This is probably the highest quality thing in my closet. It's made of fine, woven 100% cotton with subtle champagne-toned embroidery along the neckline and hem, and I just feel so elegant in it.

Elegant is not normally the way I describe myself, so it's a real pleasure to feel so put together in something that's also easy to put on and easy to wear. I wore it for a half day at work - where my volunteers oohed and awwed over it - then to run errands around town and, though it's crinkled slightly from movement and prolonged sitting, it still looks great. The fabric is lightweight and breathable, too, so it's offering some nice aeration for the sudden humidity that's taken hold of Virginia in the last couple of days.

victoria road ethical medallion split collar tunic reviewvictoria road ethical medallion split collar tunic review
Ethical Details: Medallion Split Collar Tunic - c/o Victoria Road; Shorts - old; Earrings - Hannah Naomi; Shoes - Sseko Designs via MadeFAIR

I've got a few summer weddings to attend, and I'd been looking for a blouse that was a bit more formal than my standard Everlane t-shirt to wear tucked into skirts. I think this tunic will pair well with a nice, black flouncy skirt since the neckline makes such a statement, and the fabric lays so well it feels dressy without the need for much bedazzling.

victoria road ethical medallion split collar tunic reviewethical style blog victoria road tunic

The Medallion Split Collar tunic was made ethically at Victoria Road's private factory in Lahore, Pakistan. It retails for $97.00, a small investment, but it's something that is timeless enough to wear forever and ever. Plus, it's forgiving shape means it will continue to be wearable even if I gain or lose a few pounds. The cotton fabric is also washable.

I would say this item runs true to size. I'm wearing a Small here.

New! I'm going to try to remember to tell you about the way items I feature on StyleWise were packaged...

This item came in a 100% recycled packing envelope printed with water based inks. The blouse was wrapped in a plastic liner.

Do you have anything by Victoria Road? If so, what item? 

I would love to know what you think. Also, make sure to read the interview with the founders of Victoria Road here.

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Get 20% off sitewide until July 10 with code, VRWise!


Follow along: Instagram // Facebook // Twitter // Pinterest

I need your help! Please take my Reader Survey

StyleWise ethical style blog reader survey

Hey, y'all! As I continue to write, create content, and share brands and stories, I would love to have more input from you! My goal for StyleWise is to transparently and honestly share my ethical consumerism journey with you while making sure this space feels inclusive, appropriately challenging, and ultimately encouraging. Your responses will ensure that I employ the right platforms, share the most relevant topics, and work with brands you actually care about. The survey is brief and shouldn't take more than 5 minutes. Your answers are anonymous.

The incentive? More content that is meaningful and relevant to you in your ethical journey.

review: bonJOY spring subscription box

bonjoy subscription box review
I've been waiting to get my hands on a bonJOY box to review and the time has finally come! I'm kind of skeptical of the whole idea of subscription boxes because I figure you'll nearly always end up with a few things you'll never use, but I know a lot of people like having access to an affordable sampling of products before committing to purchase at full price. For that reason, the subscription box model makes a lot of sense for ethical companies that don't have a ton of brand recognition.

The bonJOY box is unique in that it sources most, if not all, products from social enterprises working to end human trafficking and pays full wholesale prices for all goods used in the box. Products are often produced by survivors of trafficking who are paid a living wage and offered resources for recovery, and a portion of proceeds are reinvested into social causes. The company is also certified carbon neutral! Learn more about the bonJOY mission and structure here.
  bonjoy subscription box reviewbonjoy subscription box review
So what's inside the spring box? I was scared when I opened up the box to pink tissue paper, pastel gloss, and rose-tinted beads; I tend to avoid anything I deem too saccharine. But, after giving myself a few minutes to play around with the contents, I discovered a collection of products that, while definitely feminine, suit me quite well. Plus, I was made aware of a few awesome companies that would have gotten lost in a sea of ethical companies had I not had the chance to sample them through bonJOY...

This box contained 4 items with a total product value of around $60.00 (at a subscription price of $45.00):


1. Tagua Nut Necklace, Tipharah's


Natural Tagua nuts dyed and strung by fairly employed women in Ecuador, this piece is beautifully handcrafted. Not my normal look, but I think it will look great with a simple u-neck t-shirt.

2. Free to Bloom Pouch, The Tote Project


I follow The Tote Project on Instagram, so I knew a bit about their mission to fairly employee trafficking survivors in India. The pouch is made of lightweight, organic cotton and I plan to use it frequently when traveling. It's a great size for toiletries, or maybe even dirty socks.


3. Rose Sparkle Lip Gloss, My Sister


This lip gloss is a real throwback to my middle school days, but I've got to admit that I love it. A friend recently gave me a My Sister brand balm that soothed my chapped nose after a never ending cold and I'm really impressed by the quality of both products. The bonJOY blog has some application tips you can read about here.

bonjoy subscription box review
And last but not least, my very favorite of the bunch:


4. 4Her Fragrance, The THX Co.


This perfume is like catnip to me (it's no wonder because it has notes of bergamot, blood orange, mint, and roses - just a few of my favorite scents). I don't even like perfume, but I can't get enough of this stuff. Floral at first, it mellows out into a rich, smooth, drop-of-rain-water-on-a-spring-leaf-in-the-forest sort of scent. I did some extra reading on THX Co., too, and I really like their business model. 100% of profits are donated at the end of the year to a handful of charities, sustainable sourcing, pricing transparency, a focus on building infrastructure, adequate financial reporting - they've covered their ethical bases.

The bonJOY box really did bring me joy in some small way, and I am surprised, really, that a subscription box could deliver that kind of emotion. But I had a lot of fun learning about new brands and researching their ethics, and I feel even more connected to this global community of people trying to be kind, aware, and focused on what matters most.

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Follow along with bonJOY on social media: Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook.

giveaway: Malia Designs Pleated Crossbody + Matching Wallet ($80 value)

fair trade crossbody purse giveaway

Malia Designs has partnered with Style Wise for an Instagram giveaway, happening now:

Win a Pleated Crossbody and Matching Wallet from the Spring '16 Collection!


To learn more about the Pleated Crossbody, ethical guidelines, and the spring collection, see my review post here. To enter, check out the Instagram post. Best of luck!

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Enter here.


interview: introducing GoodWell, a new kind of ethical certification

GoodWell certification interview

If you've ever purchased something that was labeled "fair trade," you're already familiar with the idea of certifications. From GOTS to Fair Trade to Rainforest Certified, certification programs exist to ensure a minimum standard is met before companies can use that particular term to define their products. Not all "ethical" products are created equal, after all. Familiarizing yourself with the standards of any given certification can help you navigate your way to products you believe in.

GoodWell founder, Pete Gombert, likes the idea of certifications, but he felt that no current certification program embodied all of the qualities he - and fellow conscious consumers - looked for in an ethical company. A slew of certification programs not only confuses customers, it creates a financial burden for companies who must certify each component of their company through separate enterprises, stacking B-Corp on top of Fair Trade on top of organic cotton (GOTS) certifications. He and the GoodWell team are about to launch the first comprehensive ethical certification program on the market and, after reading this interview, I hope you'll be as excited about it as I am. 

Thanks to GoodWell for sponsoring this post.

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How did GoodWell get started? What inspired it?


About 6 years ago while I was the CEO of my third startup company, Balihoo, I was struggling to find purpose in my professional career. I have been fairly successful by conventional definitions, however, I found the work we were doing to be uninspiring and I needed more. I started looking into how I could leverage my position as the CEO of a technology company into something more purposeful and stumbled into the corporate social responsibility arena. The first book I read on the subject was Let My People Go Surfing by Yvon Chiounard, the Founder of Patagonia and it opened my eyes to the possibility of business as a force for good. Ever since that moment I have had a passion to solve the problem of the role of business in society. GoodWell is the manifestation of 6 years of research, conversations, interviews and thought on how we can slightly alter the existing system and produce massive systemic results.


What is the end goal of the GoodWell Certification program?


GoodWell’s mission is to create a world in which all businesses operate at a basic level of humanity. The GoodWell certification program will return a level of transparency to the market we haven’t seen for ages. In the past, consumers would hold companies accountable for bad behavior by not purchasing their products. Back in the day of Adam Smith, businesses were members of the community, they played a role and were expected to act with basic humanity. Today, we as consumers don’t have that level of visibility into the companies we buy from, they are simply too large and complex. Our only methods for determining if a company is worthy of our dollars are brand, price, quality and customer service. GoodWell’s simple, yet audacious mission is to change the world by giving consumers the information they need to support good, caring, conscious companies and avoid irresponsible, greedy, self-interested companies.

fair trade versus GoodWell certification

Is there a rating system? If a company reaches out and doesn't meet your minimum requirements, what happens?


GoodWell has developed a simple process to ensure companies act with basic humanity. It is a simple process with the possibility for unprecedented results:

  1. Companies join GoodWell and commit to the GoodWell Code of Conduct. 
  2. Companies measure 13 simple metrics each to demonstrate their adherence to the Code. 
  3. Every year as part of their financial audit, an independent third party verifies the company metrics.
  4. Companies display the GoodWell logo in order to provide consumers with the assurance they are buying from a good company.
If a company isn’t in compliance with all 13 metrics, they cannot become GoodWell certified. It’s a binary system that is intended to be simple, universal, and transparent, for all companies - of all sizes and in all industries. This is important because we are aiming to be the floor of corporate behavior. Our metrics should be simple for companies to achieve and as a result if a company can’t meet all metrics something in the business is wrong and should not be supported. We believe this type of transparency is critically needed in the free market today.

In the past, organizations like the Ethical Trading Initiative have been called our for having too broad a definition of what "ethical" means, resulting in labor abuses through the supply chains of some of their certified companies. How will your process differ from other broad certification programs?


GoodWell believes all companies should treat their customers, employees, communities, suppliers and the environment with decency and respect and operate in a sustainable manner. In order to achieve GoodWell certification a company must pass all 13 metrics, so one cannot become certified if it is stellar in one area but lacking in another. Further, the metrics and their collection method are required to be independently verified and audited by a third party on an annual basis.

In addition to the independent audit, GoodWell requires the company to certify their entire supply chain over a ten-year period. This is one of the most critical differences between GoodWell and other certification programs. This causes a cascading reaction all the way through the supply chain, to the very end, which is often in the parts of the world most susceptible to environmental and human rights abuses. This requirement makes it much more difficult for a company to clean up their own house and outsource their bad behavior.

For the purpose of certification, how do you define a living wage (in hourly wages)? If the federal minimum wage is raised to $15.00/hour, will this affect your certification standards in any way?


GoodWell requires companies to pay at least 90% of their full-time employees a living wage, defined as a wage high enough to keep a family of four above the poverty level. The poverty level will obviously vary by country of operation. In the US this would mean someone working full-time would need to be paid more than $12.12 per hour. If the legal minimum wage was raised above that level, then that requirement would be automatically met.

ethical certification introducing GoodWell

On your "How it Works" page, your section on suppliers says that companies must strive to GoodWell certify their supply chain. What does that mean in practical terms? If supply chains are not certified up front, what steps are taken to ensure that they are in the near future?


GoodWell has a strict requirement for certified companies to ensure their entire supply chain is GoodWell certified over the course of a 10-year period. A GoodWell company must exceed the following supply chain certification levels for each year after they sign the GoodWell Commitment:

Year 1 – 20%, Year 2 – 40%, Year 3 – 50%, Year 4 – 60%, Year 5 – 75%, Year 6 – 85%, Year 7 – 90% Year 8 – 95%, Year 9 – 98%, Year 10 – 100%

GoodWell serves as the clearinghouse for the certification standard and as such we control the calculation of the supply chain adherence. As part of the audit process the auditor will provide GoodWell with a list of all suppliers to a given company and GoodWell will then match those suppliers with our database and calculate the score to determine if the metric is met.

I'm intrigued by the idea of a universal standard - and I think it's a step in the right direction - but I worry that standards that are made too broad will result in a sort of greenwashing (or ethical-washing) of the industry and obscure the truly conscious choices. What steps are you taking to ensure this doesn't happen?


There are two keys to our program which ensure greenwashing is eliminated.

  1. Binary metrics. Because our metrics are a binary pass fail there are no grey areas or room for interpretation. Each metric must be passed in order to achieve certification.
  2. Independent Auditing. Given the lengths companies will go to promote good behavior and hide bad (look no further than Volkswagen) we believe independent certification is essential and as such it is a cornerstone of the process.

Additional Info: GoodWell is a for-profit Public Benefit Corporation with the specific goal of creating social benefit. There is a certification fee that varies based on the size of the company and companies with less than $500,000 in annual revenue are certified free of charge.

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Special thanks to Pete and Kallen for reaching out and answering all of my questions!

Interested in learning more about GoodWell? 

Check out their website


Become a founding member here.
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the moral wardrobe: falling back with Braintree Clothing

fair trade striped top

Braintree Clothing is a London based company committed to ethical manufacturing. They use natural, organic, and recycled fabrics; have a comprehensive animal welfare policy; and pay fair wages to factory employees. Additionally, they believe in maintaining long term relationships with their factories to ensure continued employment and consistent regulation.

1970s ethical outfitvintage shoes

All of that is awesome, but what attracted me to Braintree was their collection. Modern, casual, and just a bit British heritage, it's effortless, everyday wear. They provided the Jarrah Striped Tee to review on Style Wise and I love it more than I expected (and I expected to love it because it's striped!). It's made of a bamboo viscose/cotton blend with a bit of stretch and has cool buttons on the back. After I snapped these shots, I undid the bottom three buttons for more of a flyaway look with my high waist jeans. I like that the angled hem looks like a vented shirttail on a suit when the buttons are undone.

braintree clothing reviewbraintree clothing jarrah top review
Ethical Details: Jarrah Top - c/o Braintree Clothing; Earrings - c/o Bario Neal; Shoes - thrifted; Ring (not shown) - Alex & Ani

The width of the stripes and the cut made me think of casual '70s looks, so I paired it with flares and vintage, t-strap flats that remind me of clogs. The Jarrah top costs about $50.00 USD and runs true to size.

Side note: this was maybe the first time I've ever taken photos before work. With the time change, it gets dark at 5:00, but the morning light is glorious!

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Shop Braintree Clothing. Follow Braintree on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.