fashion revolution day

Mark your calendars for Fashion Revolution Day!

fashion revolution day 2015

Fashion Revolution Day is almost here! Last year, conscientious consumers were encouraged to ask the question, "Who made your clothes?" as a way of getting others to rally around the cause of universal ethical labor practices. This year, we're asking, "Who made my clothes?" to the brands and companies we support. We want transparency across the board. One of the best ways to get involved is to wear your clothing inside out on April 24th, post a photo to social media, and tag the companies represented in your outfit, making sure to ask: "Who made my clothes?"

The Fashion Revolution Day team has a great set of materials for spreading the word available here. I've excerpted a few questions from an interview with founder, Carry Somers, below (full interview available for download here).

What is Fashion Revolution Day? 

Each year, Fashion Revolution will drive forward a different campaign to tackle some of the fashion industry’s most pressing issues. It will keep the most vulnerable in the supply chain in the public eye and challenge the industry to do better. It will also demonstrate that change is possible by showcasing examples of those who are already creating a better future for fashion.
Fashion Revolution Day, on 24 April, will rally the high street, the high end, the designers, the brands, the shoppers, the media, the commentators, the activists and everyone in between. After the impact achieved last year, Fashion Revolution Day is set to become a significant annual, global event.

Why this date? 

On 24 April 2013, 1133 people were killed when the Rana Plaza factory complex collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Many more were injured. Today, people are still suffering as a direct result of our fashion supply chain. Fashion Revolution Day says enough is enough. We need to show the world that change is possible.
fashion revolution day graphics

What are you trying to achieve? 

Fashion Revolution will become a catalyst for change through a number of routes. We want to raise awareness of the true cost of fashion and its impact at every stage in the process of production and consumption; show the world that change is possible through celebrating those involved in creating a more sustainable future; bring people together the length of the value chain to ask questions and share best practice; and work towards long-term industry-wide change, getting consensus from the entire supply chain around what changes need to happen.
This year, brands and retailers will be challenged to take responsibility for the individuals and communities on which their business depends. By taking an inside-out selfie, posting it on social media and asking the brand Who Made My Clothes? people around the world can show support for greater transparency throughout the fashion supply chain.
Much of the fashion industry is burying its head in the sand. Fashion Revolution is a global movement and we will bring the message straight from the cotton farmer, the mill dyer, the seamstress, the knitter, the weaver directly to the consumer, to show the truth, to show where change needs to happen, and how we, as consumers, can make a difference. For real change to happen, every part of the supply chain has to make a commitment to change, and that includes us.

What do you say to people who were horrified at the disaster, but can’t afford to pay extra for ethically–sourced clothing? 

We’re not asking people to boycott their favourite stores, we need to change the fashion industry from within. By asking the brands and retailers where we like to shop Who Made My Clothes? we can put pressure on them to be more transparent about their supply chains.
In terms of the price, three quarters of those questioned in a YouGov/Global Poverty Project survey said they would be likely to pay an extra 5% for their clothes if there was a guarantee workers were being paid fairly and working in safe conditions. It has been estimated that putting as little as 25p onto the cost of a garment made in Bangladesh would provide the producers with a living wage and pay for factories to meeting fire and building safety standards.

I hope you'll join me this year and ask, "Who made my clothes?"

  • Find local #fashrev events here
  • Spread the news on social media with the help of these resources
  • Pin and share the graphics on this post. 

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spring flowers

Hello and Happy Easter!

Life has been incredibly busy due to a combination of saying yes to too many things and being in my church choir in the midst of Easter service preparations. But services are over now and my schedule is (hopefully) clearing up a bit in the coming weeks. I'm doing some research on China's manufacturing industry for a post, organizing another giveaway, and attempting to write a homily for this Wednesday's Evening Prayer service at church.

This season's a busy one for the ethical fashion community, as well. April 24th is Fashion Revolution Day and May 9th is World Fair Trade Day and everyone is scrambling to spread the word. I encourage you to check out the websites for each cause, start a conversation at work or with a friend, get involved in the Fair Fashion Challenge on instagram, and follow your favorite ethical retailers on social media, who will be offering giveaways and posting resources through the coming weeks. 

And if you're in the mood for some fun reading this afternoon, here are a few articles I've enjoyed recently:

Inside Gap's Plan to Get Back Into Your Drawers

"The brand enjoyed a 15-year reign over classically cool, affordable American style, but it has spent the past decade-plus struggling with an identity crisis while new retailers have colonized much of its domain."

 Why America’s obsession with STEM education is dangerous

"America will not dominate the 21st century by making cheaper computer chips but instead by constantly reimagining how computers and other new technologies interact with human beings."

How China Profits from Our Junk 

"In 2011 I visited a yard where men dismantled old aluminum deck chairs imported from somewhere warm and vacation-like. Over to one side was a pile of the blue and white nylon stripping that once hung between the metal frames (later to be sold to a plastics recycler), and a woman who spent the evening cutting it away from the chairs."

Dear American Apparel: Please #freethenipple (and pubes)

"You can argue that AA's original decision not to airbrush out, and many times, even flaunt those 'private parts' was nothing but a gimmick to court controversy-seeking press — and you may be right. But I can't think of a single other online brand that doesn't Photoshop them out."

And if you're interested in reading my Good Friday meditation, you can check it out here.

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I'm interested in knowing what you've been reading lately. Feel free to recommend some articles in the comments.

#fairfashapril style challenge: join us!

#fairfashapril

Join the Ethical Blogger Network for an ethical style challenge on instagram!

On April 24,2013, Rana Plaza, a multi-story clothing manufacturing facility just outside Dhaka, Bangladesh, collapsed, killing 1,129 workers and injuring more. It is the deadliest garment factory disaster in history.

Fashion Revolution Day was launched shortly after as a way to both honor the victims of that terrible tragedy and to rally people to help change the global manufacturing industry for the better. The Ethical Blogger Network devised a fun style challenge as a way to spark conversation and share ethical resources. We think it's a great way to unite people under a shared goal of greater transparency and safer working conditions for workers worldwide.

Join us and follow along using the hashtag, #fairfashapril. Share with the greater Fashion Revolution Day community with hashtag, #fashrev.

the moral wardrobe: fair

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I wore this today for Fashion Revolution Day. It's not inside out (I chickened out), but it is all fair trade and secondhand. Instead of being forced to tell people why I was wearing my clothes inside out, I just shouted "It's Fashion Revolution Day!" to an assortment of customers until I felt I had done my duty. Even though I work at a fair trade, organic coffee shop and have a great relationship with the owners, I didn't think it was the right environment for this type  of conversation. There just isn't enough time for deep reflection when you're making coffee all day for people with places to go and things to do.

Since April is National Poetry Month, the local library had representatives hand out poems on the Downtown Mall today. I got Saturday at the Canal by Gary Soto. They left a few at the shop so I exclaimed, "Have you gotten a poem yet?!" in between Fashion Revolution Day reminders.

Ethical choices are bolded below. Retailers taking steps to become more ethical are bolded in gray.

  • Top - People Tree

  • Skirt - secondhand via Thredup (I won a giveaway!)

  • Shoes - secondhand via ebay

  • Belt - thrifted


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