thrifted

The Moral Wardrobe: Black and White and Spring All Over


The weather hasn't quite embraced spring yet (it snowed on Saturday, ugh), but I can see it's warming up to it (pun intended). 

The flowering trees have been blooming for a couple weeks and some of them are starting to reveal their little baby spring leaves. I am full of hope that someday I'll get to wear sandals and leave my house without a sweater. I took these photos on Holy Saturday (the day before Easter) and it was still too cold to go without a sweater for more than a few minutes.

But oh how glorious that morning sun was!

Ethical Details: Top - thrifted via swap.com; Pants - Elizabeth Suzann Clyde Pants; Shoes - old Sseko Designs; Earrings - Soko (similar) via Causebox

I don't think I've talked about it much here, but I had a rough January and February. Just a lot of things on my plate and some interpersonal issues at work that fell on me to resolve. Not to mention this discernment process for ministry in the Episcopal church feels intermittently tedious and stagnant. March was a little better, and now that the days are longer and brighter, I'm feeling more stable, but I spent a lot of time feeling isolated and too much inside my own head. As much as I want to run this blog in a "professional" way, I always feel better when I feel known. So thanks for listening. 

The Moral Wardrobe: Put a Scarf on It

ethical outfit with silk scarfethical outfit with silk scarfethical outfit with silk scarfethical outfit with silk scarf
Ethical Details: Top - thrifted (similar); Sandals - Betula (similar); Scarf - thrifted; Watch - c/o The Fourth Gentlemen

I'm so glad the adorable, 1950s scarf thing is back in, because it makes every outfit look just a little more elegant. And it means that I can make an outfit I've worn in some form or the other for 2+ years look current with minimal effort.

We've had several large donations come in at the thrift shop due to the passing of a few stylish ladies. I was close to one of them, Mary, and I enjoyed feeling close with her again through the process of sorting her clothes. I never met the other woman, but she had very good taste in scarves, so I purchased three of them. Some people are turned off by the idea that they're wearing things that belonged to dead people, but I like to think a part of them can live on through the thoughtful re-wearing of their belongings. Material goods meant something to the people who collected them, and there's no reason to discount that. I honor those passed by mingling my own sense of style with theirs.

Sometimes it feels like they aren't even gone, just away for a little while.

The Moral Wardrobe: Something Old, Something New

ethical and thrifted outfit with bead and reelethical and thrifted outfit with bead and reelethical and thrifted outfit with bead and reelethical and thrifted outfit with bead and reel
Ethical Details: Top - old; Cardigan - old H&M; Skirt - thrifted; Sandals - Melissa via Bead & Reel*

The best outfits combine old favorites with new staples. This top is from a conventional brand, but it's going on year 3 this season. The cardigan is at least 4 years old. And the skirt, though it's new to me, was likely produced at least 10 years ago judging by the style and size. I picked it up for $1 at my shop's end of season sale. I purchased the sandals from ethical boutique, Bead & Reel. 

The fall and winter seasons necessitate a uniform of sorts because the primary goal is warmth. On almost any day from November to March, you'll find me wearing a bright sweater layered over an Everlane tee, plus a pair of skinny jeans and boots. But then warm weather hits and it's suddenly possible to experiment with new silhouettes. It's a little overwhelming and I often end up trying out things that don't stick. 

This year, I'm trying to stay true to the colors and patterns that I know I'll wear, and limit the number of "Oh, this is fun!" items I purchase. To that end, I'm sticking with simple skirts, unfussy patterns, lots of blues and stripes, and cropped denim. Though complicated outfits can look great, I know that I'm likely to avoid anything that needs adjusting during the day. 

The Moral Wardrobe: The $2.99 Plaid Dress

thrifted, ethical outfit with plaid dressthrifted, ethical outfit with plaid dressthrifted Pyne and Smith Clothiers look-a-likethrifted Pyne and Smith Clothiers look-a-like
Ethical Details: Dress - thrifted; Jacket - secondhand via Thredup; Shoes - Frye

I'd been eyeing a plaid linen dress from Pyne & Smith Clothiers over the last several weeks, but I couldn't justify buying a summer-weight dress in October, especially one that costs over $100. Then, on Saturday, I dropped Daniel off at a friend's house and decided to stop by Salvation Army for a look around before heading home. 

I hit the jackpot! Not only did I find this dress in an all-season plaid with adorable front pockets, I found high waist, acid wash jeans that fit me like a glove and two longer length vintage skirts that will be great for winter. I even got a groovy, '60s inspired chair to add to my library for $14.99. It was thrilling. 

I normally don't have this much luck at thrift shops, but I've found that it's worth it to stop in every once in awhile with a mental list of the silhouettes and colors I'm looking for just in case. The trick is to always try things on and check very carefully for stains before purchasing. 

I'm continually amused by the fact that I go thrift shopping on my days off from thrift shop management. Just can't get enough. 

The Moral Wardrobe: As Fate Would Have It

Ethical Details: Top - thrifted; Necklace - FashionABLE*; Shoes - old; Skirt - LuLaRoe

So, as fate would have it, the very week I posted my Buyer Be Wary post about Direct Sales schemes, one of my friends started down the course of quitting her day job to become a LuLaRoe Direct Sales representative. Still Being Molly covers LuLaRoe's ethical premise thoroughly, so I won't add anything to it (though I'm not quite convinced). 

Anyway, of course I got caught up in the excitement and made a purchase. That's the weird thing about ethics in action. At the systemic or institutional level, I don't buy it. I don't think direct sales is generally a good idea. I don't even think selling LuLaRoe is generally a good idea. But I want to see my friend thrive, so I made a purchase. I shrug my shoulders and I keep on keepin' on. I think it's important - vital even - to call attention to broad issues while being aware that, in reality, we have to weigh a variety of potential outcomes every time we make a moral decision. It's not cut and dried.

I wore this outfit to the best wedding ever and the fringe and twirly skirt were amazing on the dance floor (you may not know this about me, but I am a wedding dancing fiend). Great for polka dancing, especially!

The Moral Wardrobe: Perfect Pairings

Victoria Road tunic and Sseko Designs outfit - ethical outfitVictoria Road tunic and Sseko Designs outfit - ethical outfitthrifted straw hatVictoria Road tunic and Sseko Designs outfit - ethical outfit Ethical Details: Tunic - c/o Victoria Road (also worn here, on sale now); Hat - thrifted; Bracelet - c/o Candorra Artisans; Sandals - Sseko Designs; Jeans - old

I bought this hat at a Goodwill in LA for $4.00 and it's definitely one of those surprise finds I'll cherish for years. It came in handy during our sunny hike up to Point Dume, too. When I travel, the only souvenir I buy is something from a local thrift shop. It's low cost, reminds me of the place I visited, and tends to be more practical than a keychain with palm trees on it or whatever other nonsense thing they've created to feed our nostalgia.

I really love this outfit. It's amazing how much it feels like me while embodying something a little more even keeled, a little more mature, than how I typically see myself. Sophisticated but not stuffy. As I approach year 28, I think that's how I'd like to be described. 

The Moral Wardrobe: Wear Anywhere OESH Shoes, 3-D Printed in Charlottesville



A few weeks ago, I was checking the StyleWise inbox when a familiar name caught my attention. I opened the email to discover that my friend, Maggie, writer of this piece on badass grandmas, had recently started working for a local shoe company called OESH, and that they were interested in doing a collaboration (they provided these sandals for review).

This would have been exciting regardless, but it gets better. Not only does OESH produce the bulk of their shoes less than ten minutes from my house (in a town not known for manufacturing), they 3-D print the soles! They recently won a National Science Foundation grant to perfect their custom printers, which use biodegradable pellets instead of the traditional cording, making the process more efficient and less prone to error. OESH is also a woman owned, woman operated company where employees like Maggie actually fabricate the 3-D printers, design the shoes, and program the printers on site. Basically, it's the coolest!



Maggie and owner, Casey (that's Dr. Kerrigan to you - she was a tenured professor before quitting to start OESH), gave me a tour of the operation one muggy Saturday afternoon, showing me the ins and outs of printer maintenance and design and letting me know why OESH products are superior to traditional footwear, namely because the shape and internal structure of all OESH shoes were designed with 20+ years of studies on gait (the way people walk) in mind.

OESH makes injection-molded sneakers, too, and they're careful to avoid the super toxic glues used in traditional footwear. They're working on developing the right 3-D printed design for flats that won't require glue at all. Almost all base materials are sourced in the US, as well, with many of the sandal strap varieties made in neighboring Waynesboro. The exception is the sneaker tops - they source those from China - because high performance athletic textiles just aren't available in the US.

Ethical Details: Dress - thrifted; Bracelet - c/o Candorra Artisans; Athena Sandals in Snapdragon - c/o OESH

I'm wearing the Athena Sandals in vibrant Snapdragon yellow, but this style comes in lots of other colors. The Athena sandal retails for $135.00. See another way I wore them here

I wore these every day for 7 days when I was out of town a couple weeks ago and my feet have never been happier. I'm serious. It's tempting to wear them every day with everything. And somehow they work with everything, even boho maxi dresses.

OESH just released a new sandal style, the Artemis, and StyleWise readers will have a chance to win a pair in the color of your choice! Stay tuned for tomorrow's giveaway post here and on Instagram!

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Shop OESH here.


Follow OESH on social media: Instagram // Twitter // Facebook

The Moral Wardrobe: Lazy Summer with Sseko Designs + Mata Traders

ethical summer outfit Sseko Designs T-Strap sandals with Carnival Accent ethical summer outfit with everlane and mata traderssseko designs t-strap sandals Ethical Details: Top - Everlane; Shorts - thrifted; Layered Amulet Necklace - c/o Mata Traders; T-Strap Sandals* - Sseko Designs (worn with Carnival accents*)

I love the super hot days of summer that make it suddenly acceptable to wear cut offs and sandals everywhere you go. I love driving in my hot car with the windows down and letting the sun seep into my bones. I love feeling good with minimal effort and minimal clothing required.

If you follow me on Instagram (and are also paying a lot of attention), I recently sold my Sseko Designs' Ribbon Sandals and replaced them with the T-Straps. I have a condition called Raynaud's Syndrome that causes me to have circulation issues in my extremities and the constriction of the ribbon strap around my ankle had become a growing concern. The T-Straps are the perfect replacement, because they still have interchangeable pieces, but the straps hit lower on my foot and don't require that I secure them as tightly. I had really wanted to go with the black Nisolo Serena sandals, but the fit wasn't right, so I went with the neutral Caramel Sseko sandals instead.

In unrelated news, I decided to do an Ask Me Anything post on Instagram this week. Feel free to participate either there or in the comments section of this post.

The Moral Wardrobe: Ketchup + Mustard

sseko designs d'orsay flats via madefair outfit
everlane and gia coppola collection review
everlane and gia coppola collection review
everlane and gia coppola collection review

Ethical Details:

Tee -

Everlane

; Skirt - thrifted; Ring -

Alex & Ani

(made in USA); Shoes -

Sseko Designs

* via MadeFAIR

I ordered this tee from Everlane's

collaboration with Gia Coppola

on a whim since I had a bit of

referral credit

and was pleasantly surprised with the fit. As a general rule, if Everlane describes something as slim fit, I order one size up and when they describe something as loose-fitting, I size down. That worked well with this tee, as well - I'm wearing a Medium and the fit is just right. The banded collar and sleeves and mustard stripes make this feel very summer-in-the-70s, and I love the contrast between it and this thrifted maroon skirt. The combination is pretty close to my alma mater's Garnet and Gold.

Also, a quick note on my

Sseko Designs

* flats: I've had these for a couple months now and they're not holding up that well. Sseko Designs keeps making the mistake of using soft lambskin for their flats and it's just not hearty enough to stand up to regular (mostly inside) wear. That being said, their suede options and sandals tend to hold up a bit better and they're doing a series of anniversary sales this week, so sign up for their email list or follow them on Instagram to see if you can snag a deal.

(If you're still thinking about dyeing your hair with henna and red tea

like I did

a couple weeks ago, here is what it looks like about 4 weeks in. Still noticeably red, but the color is more subtle.)

the moral wardrobe: mud

turquoise cashmere sweater personal styleGreenheart Shop Ikat crossbodymonochrome outfit thrifted and ethical
Ethical Details: Tee - Everlane; Plaid Top - thrifted; Cardigan - J. Crew Sample Sale; Boots - thrifted; Purse - c/o Greenheart Shop

Winter sunshine - what a treat! But the downside of an unseasonably mild, sunny winter is a very muddy yard. It rains, then the ground freezes, then the sun turns everything into sludge. As a result, there's mud caked onto all of my boots now. One of the benefits of choosing better quality clothing and accessories is that I don't have to worry as much about how well things will hold up, so I can stomp through the yard as much as I want!

In other news, I'm feeling really good about 2016 so far. Realistic expectations paired with confidence that I can accomplish anything with hard work and the proper resources has changes my perspective. I'm not overwhelmed. I'm excited and I'm ready to take on whatever comes my way.


the moral wardrobe: Greenheart Shop's Ikat Crossbody

fall outfit fair trade purse from Greenheart Shop knee high boots on ebay

A mild November means the leaves have been able to hold on just a bit longer than usual and I don't mind at all. I love the bright reds of late fall. The EXTREME sunlight, on the other hand, gives me a headache, but it makes for beautiful photographs, so it (sort of) balances out.

Chicago-based Greenheart Shop sent me their lovely little Ikat Crossbody to review this week and I honestly couldn't be happier with it. I thought it was going to be slightly too small to carry all of my stuff, but the multitude of storage pockets (3 inside, 1 outside) make it easy to keep track of my phone, wallet, altoids, keys, lip balm, and ibuprofen (for the sun induced headaches). Plus, it's fully lined in a contrasting fabric and accented with pebbled leather. The price tag may seem hefty at $85.00, but the quality is exceptional - you can tell skilled artisans were behind the design and production. The brand behind the bag, Opportunity Collection, provides survivors of trafficking in India and mentally challenged artisans in Kenya fair wages and job training.

crochet scarf and ikat purseorange and black outfit
Ethical Details: Sweater - thrifted; Skirt - secondhand via ebay; Tee (not shown) - Everlane; Boots - secondhand via ebay; Scarf - thrifted; Purse - c/o Greenheart Shop

I'm always a bit biased toward Greenheart Shop, because I got a chance to visit their physical store in Chicago in June and had a wonderful time. The selection is well curated and the women behind the company are knowledgeable, passionate, and down to earth.

If you'd asked me a year ago to review an orange-hued anything, I would have said, "No, I don't wear orange." But I'm really digging all the warm, earthy hues that are popular right now. I finally understand why my mom has always loved orange, too: it looks good on us. Plus, I've accumulated a nice little selection of pinky-peachy tees and sweaters over the past several months and orange is a natural accent color.

I'm off work for the week starting tomorrow, but I'm posting a million blog posts (as in, two more this week) so stay tuned.

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Visit Greenheart Shop online here. Stay in touch on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (they'll announce their Black Friday sales soon!). 


the moral wardrobe: wearing sunshine

black and white ethical outfit stripes with bright cardigan sam edelman petty booties turquoise j crew cashmere Ethical Details: Top - thrifted; Cardigan - J. Crew Warehouse; Boots - thrifted

These photos were taken a couple weeks ago, but it might as well be today. Last week felt like summer with a warm, moist breeze and temps in the high 70s, but we're back to reality now and the sunshine is on a break again. I love this cardigan because it's abrasively bright. If it glows this much during cloud cover, imagine how bright it looks on a sunny day! I realized about halfway through my first winter here that everyone's typical black and gray uniform was not going to work for me. If I can't see the sun, I want to wear something bright to cheer me up. 

Speaking of bright, I bought some very red henna and am planning on dyeing my hair again within the next few days. I'm also thinking about growing it out! 


the moral wardrobe: thrift score

sam edelman outfit
sam edelman petty booties review
thrifted style
Ethical Details: Top - thrifted; Dress (worn as skirt) - c/o Synergy Organic Clothing; Necklace - c/o Bought Beautifully; Boots - thrifted Sam Edelman

I always take a final lap around the thrift store before checking out just to make sure I didn't miss anything. It was my lucky day a couple months ago at Valley Thrift in Cincinnati, because the final lap revealed a practically new pair of Sam Edelman Petty Booties (retail price: $140.00) for $4.00! I'm pretty sure the shop attendant who priced them didn't realize what they had, because they aren't shy about pricing nice things in the $10-20 range at least.

They're a perfect fit and really comfortable despite having such a low toe box and angled toe. I like that they're an alternative to ballet flats and a great option under flared jeans. I know bloggers have been raving about this style for awhile now, but I don't put much stock in the opinions of people who actually like wearing heels - I just assume that everything they wear is uncomfortable - but these are awesome. If you like this style, maybe try your luck on ebay?

the moral wardrobe: Liz Alig Ada skirt

liz alig review

Liz Alig has been on the ethical fashion scene for several years and had a wildly popular (well, wildly popular in my mind, at least) dress made out of flour sacks, which they still produce. This season's line offers lots of versatile options in recycled cotton sourced from old t-shirts. Liz Alig sent me the Ada skirt to review today.

Liz Alig products are designed in Indianapolis, Indiana (woot woot! I was born in nearby Anderson) with 100% recycled or organic fabrics and fair labor standards. They also incorporate traditional textile and weaving work done by artisans around the world. The Ada skirt was made in partnership with a fair trade organization in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Learn more about their mission here

liz alig ada skirt
liz alig
Ethical Details: Top - thrifted; Skirt - c/o Liz Alig; Necklace: handmade via (of)matter on etsy; Sandals - Sseko Designs

The coolest thing about this skirt is that all of the fabric is sourced from old t-shirts, but that also means that you can't select an exact color. I think I would have been happy with anything, but I can't resist heather gray, so I'm happy with the one I received.

I like the zig zag hem and the foldover top. It's a great skirt for weekend wear. I wore this outfit for a belated anniversary dinner at a new-ish Neapolitan pizza joint in town. I do want to mention, however, that though the skirt is advertised as a versatile dress/skirt combo, the seam edge is unfinished on the foldover portion that can be pulled up into a tube top, so it will be a bit obvious you're wearing a multi-use item. Also, an important note on fit: there is no elastic in the waistband and I had to pull this one over my head since it wouldn't go over my hips. This could pose a problem for people with different body proportions.

Check out Julia's behind-the-scenes post for more about Liz Alig. 
Follow Liz Alig on twitter, instagram, and facebook. Check out the Fall '15 line, too.

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Stay tuned for another product review and a giveaway coming later this week!

RIP beautiful overgrown backyard bush. My landlady had it cut down last week. :(

the moral wardrobe: on being (sunburnt) with American Nomad

Ethical Details: Dress - Mata Traders; Sandals - Betula; Hat - thrifted; Necklace - c/o American Nomad

The weird thing about blogging is that I feel obligated to tell you that my mother-in-law just left town after staying a week at our house. Her side of the family is rooted in Baltimore, so we spent the last two weekends road tripping up for surprise parties and backyard BBQs, getting hugs from people we'd never met, and eating more than we normally would in a week, including steamed crabs covered in Old Bay seasoning (a regional tradition). Fortunately for me, my mother-in-law did the driving (fun fact: Daniel doesn't drive) and I sat in the back reading Being Mortal by Atul Gawende (I highly recommend it!). 

We dropped Kathy off at the airport in Richmond on Monday and decided to meander through Carytown for a little while before heading home, which is how I got my first sunburn of the year; I forgot to bring my sun hat, too!

On to my outfit: Michelle, the founder of fair trade accessories brand American Nomad, contacted me a few months ago to connect and see if I'd be interested in writing a guest post for the American Nomad blog. We both got distracted by other things, so it took awhile to work out the details, but the post is up now! She sent me this beautiful necklace as a thank you and I love it because it's modern and reminds me a bit of honeycomb. Thank you, Michelle. 

I encourage you to check out American Nomad online. The shop is well curated and the graphic design and photography work is stunning!

the moral wardrobe: Hands Producing Hope Shalom necklace

hands producing hope shalom necklace
hands producing hope shalom necklace

Hands Producing Hope is an accessories company with a mission to support marginalized women in Costa Rica through dignified work, life skills courses, and spiritual guidance. They sent me this beautiful Shalom necklace to review and it's become a fast favorite. 

The Shalom necklace is made of glass beads and seeds from the Ojo de Buey ("eye of the bull," part of the legume family) and Jaboncillo harvested by the artisans. I like that it's an organic twist on a statement necklace, plus the neutral tone makes it versatile. I wore it four days in a row when I first got it!

fair trade jewelry
fair trade outfit
Ethical Details: Top - c/o Tonle; Skirt - secondhand via thredup; Necklace - c/o Hands Producing Hope

I reached out to founder, Rebecca Gardner, for a behind-the-scenes interview about the daily running of Hands Producing Hope. I've included a few of her answers below (you'll see the rest Wednesday).

What does a day in the life of an artisan look like at Hands Producing Hope? 


The days of our artisans vary quite a bit because we work with women ranging from high school students to grandmas! Most of their days start soon after the sun rises, begins with either getting their own children ready for school or getting themselves ready for school. Soon after waking up they begin making the fire that will likely be burning during the entire day. Rice is a fairly normal breakfast or at times it is some form of meat if the family has recently slaughtered a chicken or pig (with no refrigeration, meat needs to be cooked right away and then consumed fairly quickly).

The women work on their jewelry or headband assignments throughout the day as they have time. This often happens while babies are napping, beans are cooking or kids are in school. Having the flexibility to work any time during the day or even not work on day and just do more work another is key for the women in our program, as many of them have many other responsibilities with their families! Often families have houses near each other and so sisters, cousins and in laws will get together during the day to work together and just spend some time socializing. If there is a soccer game on, you are sure to find a large crowd at the nearest house with a TV that evening. While this isn't an exact representation of what every day looks like for the women in our program, I hope this gives you a glimpse into their daily lives!

How do you select materials for your goods? Who designs them? 


We love utilizing local, natural materials. We also love the contrast of a beautiful metal beside a hand picked seed. Our products include materials found in the artisans local village, a near by town, and around the world. The designs are a collaboration between myself and our awesome board member/product design extraordinaire Emily Duke. We often pull designs from traditional Guaymi patterns and styles!

Make sure to check back this Wednesday to learn more about Hands Producing Hope and enter to win your own Shalom necklace!

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Check out Hands Producing Hope on facebook, twitter, and instagram. Shop here

the moral wardrobe: backlogged

Ethical Details: Earrings - handmade by Hannah Naomi; Top - thrifted; Sandals - Sseko Designs


I started this post, uh, like a month ago and forgot to post it!

This morning, I dropped off Daniel at school, then headed over to Albemarle Baking Company, a Charlottesville staple. I dreamed about their chocolate croissants last night, so I was determined to get one. When I got to the counter, I ran into my old boss from Java Java! The male attendant complimented me on my Sseko Designs sandals, handed me my croissant and hot tea, and I settled into an outdoor table with a magazine for the next hour or so. 

I'm not very good at taking time to just breathe. I spent a lot of time at home dawdling and reading blogs, but my mind's always preoccupied with the next task, so it was nice to really settle into leisure time this morning. 

the moral wardrobe: after the storm

Ethical Details: Top - thrifted; Skirt - secondhand via ebay; Sandals - thrifted; Earrings - handmade by Hannah Naomi via Ash & Rose

Man, the past couple of weeks have been rough. So much being-a-grown-up required at every turn. Difficulties at work, last minute deadlines, flights to schedule, complicated talks with the duplex mates. It's one thing after another. When it all piles up at once like this, I often do two things: shop and have a crisis of self esteem. Though, as expected, these things did happen, I managed them a little better. Instead of spending money on fast fashion (or even slow fashion), I bought myself some Chik-Fil-A and got a hair cut. Instead of angrily picking my pimples, I put on a little extra makeup and got on with the week. I'm trying to go easy on myself without throwing in the towel and it's helped immensely to just simplify my routine and put on things that make me feel comfortable.

I know I've been an adult for several years now, but 26 has been the transformative year of actually feeling like one. It's not always good, but I am managing. And I think, more than anything, it's the confidence that I can manage it that makes me feel grown up.

inside an ethical wardrobe: spring 2015

ethical capsule wardrobe

Spring has sprung here in Charlottesville, so I'm back with another installment of my "Inside an Ethical Wardrobe" series. See my winter post here and my jewelry post here.


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I've been in aggressive spring cleaning mode for several weeks and I've finally been able to part with a lot of things I was holding onto because of their nostalgic or "practical" value. I'm a firm believer that it's ok to have an attachment to things that remind of us people, places, and experiences we love, but it was time to clear out old high school event t-shirts and ill-fitting blouses.

striped tees

I'm left with a reasonable, varied assortment of knit cotton tops, including several v-necks from Everlane, a few fair trade statement tops, a couple old items purchased from conventional retailers, and several thrifted items.

Note that a few things are missing either because I was wearing them or they were in the wash, but this is a pretty accurate representation of my wardrobe.

thrifted cardigan

I'm a cardigan lover, so I have about double what's depicted here, including a mustard yellow cardigan (an old purchase) I'm wearing while I write this post, a Seamly.co wrap cardigan (made in USA), and a thrifted shawl collar cardigan.

spring skirts wardrobe

I love skirts for spring and summer, particularly midi and maxi skirts that allow me to move freely without fearing my skirt will fly up. The above skirts are (clockwise from top left): Fleet Collection (made in USA), thrifted, secondhand via thredUP, Mata Traders (fair trade), and thrifted. I have a black skirt from thredUP coming in the mail this week.

ethical dresses

And finally, a mess of dresses. About half of my dresses are fair trade and the other half are thrifted or vintage. The ones pictured here are (clockwise from top): thrifted, Nomads, Synergy Organic, thrifted, vintage, and fair trade/sustainable from Gaia Couture.

I left out a few rarely worn graphic tees, formal dresses, and two button-ups that I keep around for professional events. I'll do a separate post for shoes and accessories later.

And just a quick reminder that this isn't a capsule wardrobe. The items I photographed in my winter wardrobe post are still in regular rotation when the weather is suitable for them. Maybe it's my Florida upbringing, but I prefer to wear as much of my wardrobe as possible year round. In fact, I'm wearing my high waist jeans today.