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Ethical Details: Sweater - LL Bean thrifted ( similar ); Jeans - Vintage Lee thrifted ( similar ); Earrings - Molly Virginia Made via Darling Boutique; Boots - Po-zu I have been super lucky on the vintage jeans front lately. I can't deal with the super rigid jeans of the 80s and 90s, but the thrift shop has gotten in some early versions of stretch denim circa 2000 and this delightful pair of elastic waste jeans in soft, 100% cotton. I feel like the coolest "mom" in these mom jeans, children not required. I just need a scrunchy to polish off the look. I was self conscious at first about wearing them out of the house, but because they're so obviously vintage, they make an offbeat statement that has mostly been interpreted as positive among my friends and colleagues. And a part of me just can't manage to care as much as I used to. Sure, I want things that flatter my figure and fit me well, but I can't live my life in jeans that constrict. With my hair cr...
Sponsored by Pela Case  in collaboration with the EWC . Thoughts, research, and images are my own. I have a confession: I would have liked to believe that the real reason I still use an iPhone 5c circa 2013 - which is practically a century ago in phone years - is because I am deeply committed to sustainable consumerism's "make it last" philosophy, but it recently dawned on me that the real reason is that I like a good bargain. I bought my iPhone refurbished in 2016. My very first smart phone, I finally bit the bullet because people kept talking about how great Instagram was (sigh! What a can of worms I opened) and I couldn't access it on my dependable LG slider phone I'd had for like, ten years. I think I paid about $250 for my smart phone, and it's been a very good investment. The reality is that I do think buying refurbished technology is a good idea, not only for the cost savings, but also because smart phone production is catastrophic for the enviro...
This post contains affiliate links I try to feature things I own over and over again in daily outfit photos in Instagram Stories and on the blog, but sometimes there's just not enough time in the day to spotlight my outfit repeats. So today is particularly fun, because I'm going to talk about the Everlane Swing Trench I purchased and reviewed almost exactly a year ago. It's no longer available on the Everlane website, but you can still peruse Poshmark and Ebay for it if it's something you think would be useful. The Everlane Swing Trench One Year Later Last year, Everlane released the Swing Trench too late in the season for Charlottesville. If I'm remembering correctly, the season turned cold several weeks early and by the time I received the jacket, it was too lightweight to keep me warm most days. But over the course of the year, I've found it to be the perfect layering piece for spring and early fall. The tight cotton weave makes the jacket water res...
In one of the most appalling greenwashing angles I've ever seen, Thredup just released their "Remade" line . Contrary to its name, Remade is not remade at all. Rather, it's made with new fibers - some items with virgin polyester - with a premise that these items can be resold to Thredup for 40% of the original price, where they can then be resold on the site. There are a number of troubling components to this campaign. First, its name. "Remade" isn't remade Companies like Eileen Fisher actually remake some of their older garments into new designs, which is a great way to use up textiles that still have life in them, or, in the case of Hackwith Design - who prioritizes sustainable and deadstock fabrics - buy back older styles to resell as an incentive to their customers. And indie brands like Christy Dawn use deadstock fabric , which serves a similar purpose of keeping old textile inventory out of landfills. Thredup's "Remade" lin...
Post contains affiliate links Fair trade, vegan, eco-friendly shoes from Po-Zu and Nicora For the last three years, I have experimented with going vegan for environmental reasons. Industrial animal agriculture is brutal for animals - and that was a factor, too - but going all in required a bigger picture reason for me . And that turned out to be the reality of massive deforestation due to cattle grazing . As more of the world enters the middle class , meat is now more financially accessible to more people, which means global demand continues to rise. I eventually settled on a reduced meat diet rather than total removal, for the benefit of my health and the reality of my context in Southern culture, where meat is almost always a part of social gatherings (the endless potlucks make it easy to be somewhat freegan in these parts, too). In August, I learned something that further contextualized the meat industry: it's about leather, too. See, I thought leather was a secondary ...
Trying to get these link-y posts back up and running. I don't think I've done one since Summer 2017! I read a lot of blogs and articles in any given week, but saving the links somewhere so I can chronicle them here is sometimes too much to ask (and really, no one was asking anyway, but I really love reading these types of posts so it seems like a good idea to create them, too). This month is going to be FULL of features and gift guides, and I'm trying my best to manage my time so that they're the best they can be. I hate to be one of those people who starts talking about December holidays on November 2nd, but working in retail has retrained my brain to think Christmas starts in October, so that's the way it is! Here's what I've been reading this week... Ethical Subculture ✸  Talia reflects on the complexities of want, influencer culture, and comparison ✸  Lyn hosted a really good discussion on the lack of class diversity in the Instagram ethical...
This post was written by Francesca Willow and was originally published on Ethical Unicorn, a blog about ethical fashion and social justice. Reposted with permission. There are many ways to make your approach to fashion, and your own closet, more sustainable. You can move towards more secondhand purchases such as thrifting or finding ethical vintage fashion . You can move away from buying with the trends and find longer-lasting, non-boring personal style instead , or try working towards changing your perspective on spending vs investment , looking at long term money saving (even if it’s more expensive up front) rather than just finding bargains. There really are a hundred different ways to get started, depending on the kind of person you are and what works for you. All of these things are great, otherwise I wouldn’t have written about them, but they also require a little bit of time. Both to implement, and to fully form into new habits and skill that come as second nature, not ...
Ethical Details (contains affiliate links): Henley - c/o Tradlands ; Jeans - Everlane Cheeky ; Clogs and Earrings - Darling Boutique (local); Bag - c/o Accompany I've been taking advantage of the free form nature of these "The Moral Wardrobe" posts to write little essays, but today it's all about the outfit. I feel very fashun in this, which is funny in a way because I'm wearing a henley and jeans. But look at how nice this henley is! The color, the fit - it's perfectly tailored - the way the menswear element offsets the femininity of the clogs. It's from Tradlands, a company I've heard about over and over again because they're much loved in the ethical fashion community on Instagram. But I thought it was all hype until this piece arrived. The good news is that it's absolutely a beautiful, functional piece. It does, however, hit at a higher price point than you average tee, at $79. Tradlands focuses on ethical menswear-inspi...
To be honest, I wasn't anxiously awaiting Everlane's corduroy release. But then the weather got cold and I started panicking. My closet seems to be full of slightly uncomfortable, summery pants and skirts with few good options for real fall weather. I'm not much of a winter dress wearer (unless I'm layering them over jeans), so pants are basically vital. Ethical Details: Tee - Everlane ; Cords - Everlane ; Cardigan - thrifted; Sneakers - Po-zu  Grechen reviewed the Everlane cords in white this week and didn't really like them, so I wasn't expecting much from these when they arrived. But they're really great in a lot of ways... Everlane Corduroy Straight Crop in Golden Brown The Good Fabric: The wide cord fabric, made from 99% cotton and 1% elastane, is SUPER comfortable. Definitely the most comfortable pants I've tried from Everlane. Fit: The fit is very similar to Everlane's other pants in the waist and hip, but I chose to go up...
This post was written by Rebecca Ballard, founder of Maven Women and all around wonderful human who I had the good fortune of spending time with in DC last month. I view my chief parenting role as that of educator.  The world will throw all kinds of stuff at my son, and within my home and in my community I can create a world based on my values and give him the tools to make wise choices when he is one day an adult. This is why it’s so important to me to parent in line with my values from day one, while also giving myself grace for imperfections as parenting is hard. Before I became a parent I heard I would need so much more space for all of this new, extra stuff. As someone who hates clutter and values minimalism , this terrified me. It also made me even more determined to find ways to be minimalist and eco-conscious along the way.  Yet how does one live these values as a parent, especially in a country where childhood is often filled with lots and lots of plastic? T...
Grandma was a collector. A child of the Great Depression, Grandma's family kept a small homestead in Indiana. Her father was a Pentecostal preacher. She used to tell me stories of having to "wring the chickens' necks" when it was time for dinner. This story was always accompanied by mischievous laughter, knowing she would shock her granddaughters by recounting the everyday violence. Grandma, when she was older and owned a used appliance store with Grandpa, began collecting old costume jewelry, furniture picked up at yard sales, and discounted clothing by the closet full. She wasn't like other grandmas who knitted and quilted and made things with her hands. She was a shopper. My earliest memories of going shopping are with her. We would head for the sales racks, try things on, marvel at the deals we'd gotten. Because I lived so close to her - my sister and I could bike over to her house in under twenty minutes - I got used to these excursions. Shopping ...
I took a lot of notes at the DC Sustainable Fashion Collective 's Unveiling Fashion event in September. But those notes, in most ways, don't tell the story of what I actually learned. That's because the event, for me, was more about tangible energy, impressions , quiet conversations, and knowing applause. It was about occupying physical space. It was about living, breathing, tangible people. Ahhh! (That's a sigh of relief.) After years cooped up in my internet hole, I was finally set free at the dog park. When you're sitting in your robe and mismatched socks (ethical influencer Benita Robledo, who I met at the conference, calls it her "bird lady" outfit) gazing out at your overcrowded, paper strewn kitchen table in a moment of distraction between responding to emails and writing blog posts, it can be very easy to forget what it feels like to be a functioning human. Identity-building is traditionally about navigating your place in community, but whe...