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Sponsored Ethical Details: Custom Embroidered T-Shirt - c/o Known Supply ; Jacket - c/o Hackwith Design ; Authentic Stretch Denim - Everlane ; Mini Ellen Hoops - c/o Sela Designs If there's one thing I learned from the Glam Capsule, I am a creature of both comfort and habit. I want to make a statement, but it's ok if it's not evident from several yards away. It's all in the details. So today I'm wearing some of MY classics. They may not look like a French Wardrobe or a standard capsule, but they're things that work for me, again and again. I've worn this Hackwith Design Jacket , for instance, at least 20 times since I got it in July. It works as a going-out jacket, car coat, and beach cover-up and it always garners compliments. This surprised me at first because I wasn't sure how such a simple piece could make an impact, but the details, the fit, and the confidence it gives me are noticeable. This shirt , too, is one of my very favorite things...
For the past few months, I've been on a journey. Since early July, I've been working on a freelance project with a new ethical fashion company, writing a series of articles on ethical fashion, labor movements, and certifications. Having external prompts and external feedback helped me work out questions I had struggled to resolve by myself. I also read Tara Button's book, A Life Less Throwaway , in just under 7 hours and became fixated on the chapters about planned obsolescence , the way marketers and makers exploit our psychological need for novelty and social conformity to get us to buy more. Finally, I undertook the #glamcapsule 10X10 challenge, which forced me to get *really* creative with my wardrobe since I chose loud colors and prints that at some point had to be mixed and matched (a throwback to the pattern mixing days of my early 20s). It also provided excruciating clarity on what my actual style is, to the point of nightmares! These things on their own don...
High-Rise | Mid-Rise I used store credit garnered from my referral link to purchase product for review When Everlane announced they were making stretch denim , I was elated! As much as I love the Cheeky Jeans (wearing them right now, actually), I spend about five hours in choir rehearsals each week. If you've ever tried to sing while sitting in high-rise, non-stretch denim, you'll understand that it's no easy feat. It's uncomfortable because you can't ever get to full lung capacity. I also prefer skinnier denim for my fall and winter silhouettes of crewneck sweaters and long cardigans. It just feels more balanced. So this seemed serendipitous. In my enthusiasm, I quickly ordered the high-rise denim, unaware that they also released it in mid-rise, which is actually what I was aiming for. So I ended up sampling both styles and thought it might be helpful to offer a side-by side comparison of the two. Everlane Authentic Stretch Denim Review I ordered the H...
Ethical + Sustainable Clothing Contains affiliate links Bookmark this comprehensive list of ethical brands, boutiques, and marketplaces to use as a reference when you shop! Brands A Beautiful Refuge | Organic and fair t-shirts and home goods Abrazo Style | Artisan embroidered in Mexico Alternative Apparel | California casual style Amour Vert | Feminine, drapey, made in USA with eco fabrics Ankura | Alpaca and cotton knits Dorsu | Casual, drapey knits made from factory remnants Ecovibe Apparel | "Affordable, ethical fashion" with boho vibes Elegantees | Stretch cotton casuals with a twist Encircled | Versatile, eco-friendly multiway garments Everlane | Minimalist, everyday items made with transparency Fair Indigo | Pima cotton casual wear Indigenous Designs | High quality, fair, organic Known Supply | Cotton basics with cool details KOTN | Well made, Egyptian cotton basics Krochet Kids | Casual knits with cool details Mata Trade...
Ethical fashion has a racial representation problem. While we celebrate the women, predominantly women of color, who make our clothing once a year during Fashion Revolution - and maybe a couple more times around the Holidays - in almost all cases, we see white faces and white cultural expectations plastered across Instagram, in marketing campaigns, and in product photos. This dichotomy hurts people of color because it always establishes white people as saviors and people of color as mere beneficiaries of care. The reality is far more complicated than that, which is why I reached out to several women in the ethical fashion space to ask difficult questions about representation. I'll be sharing a couple more interviews later on, but today I'd like to introduce you to Tavie Meier. Tavie and I have known each other for a couple of years, having worked together on collaborations when she owned an ethical fashion brand, MadeFAIR. I encourage you to read this interview with opennes...
Sponsored by Rainforest Alliance . Text, photos, and stories are my own. As a child of the nineties and early aughts, I was saturated in environmentalism. From Fern Gully to Animal Planet documentaries to political conversations on climate change, it was impossible not to know something about earth's dire state, and our responsibility to protect and restore it. I'm sure I watched hundreds of nature documentaries growing up, but the topic I came back to again and again was the rainforest. Simply put, it was enchanting, and as a young kid with an active imagination, who wouldn't be mesmerized by tales of jaguars, river dolphins, toothy piranha, poisonous frogs, sloths, monkeys, not to mention the vast mystery of life bustling beneath the canopy on the dark forest floor? While other kids were playing Oregon Trail, I was busy playing Amazon Trail (no, I never finished - spear hunting for fish is hard!). Honestly, I'm still enchanted. I've watched Planet Earth ...
A few weeks ago, my ethical blogger colleague, Benita Robledo, reached out to the EWC with a proposition: participate in a new minimalist blogger challenge with a twist .  Schemed up by Benita and Elizabeth Cline (author of the book, Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion and fellow thrift shop mouse), the #glamcapsule is a play on the popular 10x10 challenge during which participants select 10 items of clothing from their closet to mix and match for 10 consecutive days. An overwhelming number of participants in the original challenge favor a neutral, boxy, minimalist aesthetic, which can lead people to believe that ethical fashion requires aesthetic minimalism and a literal muting of silhouette and color diversity. This isn't true! Ethical fashion can be as varied as each person in this movement. Yes, there are predominant trends, but you are under no obligation to follow them. By using ethically made, secondhand, vintage, and old standbys, you can create a...
This post was written by Polly Barks and originally appeared on Green Indy Blog . Shared with permission. A plant-based diet. It’s a scary idea to many, but a necessary push for anyone concerned about their carbon footprint. Luckily, everyone’s plant-based diet will look different depending on your dietary needs, access, location, and a whole host of other personal choices. This post explores our problem with meat, the impact of a switch to veganism or vegetarianism, and take a look at why anyone claiming just one way of eating is just plain wrong. I have a personal ethical stance on the treatment and consumption of animal products. This is a more practical, data-driven look at the issue that only briefly talks ethics re: cultural differences. I understand ethics are central to most people’s beliefs around meat, but I ask you keep an open mind and make any and all dialogue respectful. Our Problem with Meat The modern Western world and its industries have an unhealthy relation wi...
A lovely little bee in my neighborhood If you've been around StyleWise for awhile, you'll recall that I humbly ask you to fill out my (brief!) reader survey each year.  It really helps me decide how to prioritize content, what subjects to delve more deeply into, and get to know you (as an anonymous group) better. And if you look through previous results , you'll see that I take into account your short answers and thoughts when considering what to write about, from plus size fashion to feminism to race in the ethical space (more on that is planned for the coming months). The survey shouldn't take you more than a couple minutes to complete! I'll leave the survey open until September 17th and put together a report after that! If you're completing the survey from you phone or tablet, you may want to do so from this link .   Loading......
I purchased this jacket with shopping credits earned through my referral link and this post contains some affiliate links I have a weird relationship with jean jackets. I found an amazing Levi's jean jacket in a one-of-a-kind sample style at a thrift shop near my parents' house years ago, but never really wore it because I'm not a huge fan of the Canadian tuxedo (it's still tucked away in the back of my closet because I can't bear to part with it). I also had a denim-look knit jacket I wore for a season, but the sleeves were too long and then the zipper broke. But I still dream of that early 90s, light wash, oversized jean jacket bedazzled with hot air balloons I had as a young kid, so when I saw that Everlane was releasing a sustainable jacket in vintage-inspired washed black, I immediately saved up credits to buy it. Also, note that this is the premiere of my new "studio." Sure, there's an unsightly (vintage?!) space heater on the wall but ...
Levi's Waterless | Everlane | Ace & Jig Out of all of the contemporary brands at a mid-level price range, Madewell stands out as most representative of what women want to be wearing right now.  It's a vintage Americana-meets-minimalist aesthetic that captures that aspirational need to feel polished and perfectly laid back at the same time. We could delve into the ways clothing acts as a sort of costume for living into our aspirations, but that would take awhile. For now, I'll just say this: while Madewell and its parent company, J Crew, have a standard corporate social responsibility document in place, there is no evidence that the brand enforces these policies. In fact, a cursory search on Google will render multiple results for evidence of sweatshop labor. This doesn't mean that the J Crew-Madewell conglomerate is worse than most conventional brands, but it does mean they're not prioritizing sustainable practices in their supply chain (though, accord...