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50 Ethical, Sustainable, & Zero Waste Gifts

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Contains affiliate links A constantly updating list of... Ethical Black Friday Weekend & Cyber Monday Sales Ongoing: Bhava Studio Shoes :  $60 OFF any order over $250 with code: THANKYOU60 $150 OFF any order over $500 with code: THANKYOU150 + FREE SHIPPING in the US! Po-Zu Shoes : 40% off with code, BETHECHANGE ABL E Clothing & Accessories : 30% off with code, ABLE30 LUR Apparel : 30% off with code, GET30 GlobeIn : 30% Off Sitewide and Free Shipping on orders $50+ Purchase any 3 Month or longer Premium Artisan Box Subscription from GlobeIn, and receive a Mystery Box free Ends 11/25 Accompany : 20% off with code, SALEWITHSOUL20 30% off orders over $250 with code, SALEWITHSOUL30 40% of orders over $500 with code, SALEWITHSOUL40 Ends 11/26 Au Naturale Cosmetics : 70% off all items in Sale Encircled : 20% OFF select regular priced items + FREE shipping to US and Canada on orders over $75 with code, FRIDAY18  Ends Friday Ash & Rose : 15% off s...
This post was sponsored by BuyMeOnce with concept by me. I generally stay far away from anything in the self help genre, including minimalist lifestyle books. So A Life Less Throwaway by BuyMeOnce founder, Tara Button, was a pleasant surprise. Chock-full of historical and psychological research with useful anecdotes from her advertising days mixed in, A Life Less Throwaway convinced me that it is possible to keep my own sartorial identity, continue to enjoy fashion, and reduce my overall consumption without devolving into crisis. I may sound like a drama queen, but I have to admit that it has been extraordinarily difficult at times to convince myself to slow down my consumption because I feel like I'm losing a beloved hobby, or worse, a part of myself. Button's practical, authoritative voice really changed the way I look at my wardrobe. As I mentioned, the book wasn't Button's first foray into exploring sustainable consumption. A few years prior, she started a ...
This post was sponsored by Nimble in partnership with Ethical Writers & Creatives . You've heard about my ancient iPhone technology , so now let me tell you about my ancient car. Goldie Locks II is a gold 2000 Saturn SL2 with all the features, including a cassette player and a CD player, and a sunroof that we can no longer open because the fabric liner will fall down and cause reckless driving. I was telling my husband how excited I am to have a new, sustainable tech charger from Nimble because it will make it possible to take our annual road trip down to Florida without fear of a dying iPhone and loss of GPS. He pointed out that most people have a way of charging their phones through a tech port or other plugin in their cars and thus my brilliant concept for this post was less brilliant than I'd initially imagined. I'll admit that he's probably right, but I still stand by my choice to prioritize a portable charger that can charge a phone as many as ...
This post was co-sponsored by brands I reached out to and contains affiliate links I decided to take the month of December off, though we'll see how long I can rein in my workaholic tendencies to make that happen. In any case, I thought I would try to offer the most useful, most epic, most thorough ethical wishlist of all time - for StyleWise anyway - to make up for my absence. Items in this list were selected based on metrics of fair labor, eco-friendliness, quality, and aesthetic. I selected products at a variety of price points, and offer "Shop All" links to help you peruse other items in each brand's line. I built it out with an idea that there would be something for everyone, and I hope that's the case! Happy Holidays and happy shopping! For the Techie ✸ Pela Case // Sea Turtle Case | Shop All ✸ Nimble // Wireless Pad | Shop All ✸ Uncommon Goods // Laptop Bag | Shop All ✸ Looptworks // Upcycled Neoprene Sleeve | Shop All ✸ GlobeIn // ...
Hello! As you know, StyleWise takes on advertising partners throughout the year in order to support the ongoing work of this blog. I have tried to be very up front about my strategy with readers, simply because there's a lot of misinformation and deception - however unintentional - in the world of blogging. This year in particular, I have worked to build out a quality over quantity strategy that pays me fairly and creates effective brand awareness for the brands I work with. On that note, today I wanted to introduce my 2019 Collaboration strategy.  In an effort to create the types of partnerships that most benefit all 3 parties - the reader, the brand, and me - I will be introducing a new format next year. Quarterly Partnerships How It Works: The brand will pay a base rate at the beginning of the quarter and provide 1-2 items of clothing or accessories for me to use and wear regularly.  Brands and products are selected at my discretion to ensure a high degree of transp...
Ethical Details: Sweater - LL Bean thrifted ( similar ); Jeans - Vintage Lee thrifted ( similar ); Earrings - Molly Virginia Made via Darling Boutique; Boots - Po-zu I have been super lucky on the vintage jeans front lately. I can't deal with the super rigid jeans of the 80s and 90s, but the thrift shop has gotten in some early versions of stretch denim circa 2000 and this delightful pair of elastic waste jeans in soft, 100% cotton. I feel like the coolest "mom" in these mom jeans, children not required. I just need a scrunchy to polish off the look. I was self conscious at first about wearing them out of the house, but because they're so obviously vintage, they make an offbeat statement that has mostly been interpreted as positive among my friends and colleagues. And a part of me just can't manage to care as much as I used to. Sure, I want things that flatter my figure and fit me well, but I can't live my life in jeans that constrict. With my hair cr...
Sponsored by Pela Case  in collaboration with the EWC . Thoughts, research, and images are my own. I have a confession: I would have liked to believe that the real reason I still use an iPhone 5c circa 2013 - which is practically a century ago in phone years - is because I am deeply committed to sustainable consumerism's "make it last" philosophy, but it recently dawned on me that the real reason is that I like a good bargain. I bought my iPhone refurbished in 2016. My very first smart phone, I finally bit the bullet because people kept talking about how great Instagram was (sigh! What a can of worms I opened) and I couldn't access it on my dependable LG slider phone I'd had for like, ten years. I think I paid about $250 for my smart phone, and it's been a very good investment. The reality is that I do think buying refurbished technology is a good idea, not only for the cost savings, but also because smart phone production is catastrophic for the enviro...
This post contains affiliate links I try to feature things I own over and over again in daily outfit photos in Instagram Stories and on the blog, but sometimes there's just not enough time in the day to spotlight my outfit repeats. So today is particularly fun, because I'm going to talk about the Everlane Swing Trench I purchased and reviewed almost exactly a year ago. It's no longer available on the Everlane website, but you can still peruse Poshmark and Ebay for it if it's something you think would be useful. The Everlane Swing Trench One Year Later Last year, Everlane released the Swing Trench too late in the season for Charlottesville. If I'm remembering correctly, the season turned cold several weeks early and by the time I received the jacket, it was too lightweight to keep me warm most days. But over the course of the year, I've found it to be the perfect layering piece for spring and early fall. The tight cotton weave makes the jacket water res...
In one of the most appalling greenwashing angles I've ever seen, Thredup just released their "Remade" line . Contrary to its name, Remade is not remade at all. Rather, it's made with new fibers - some items with virgin polyester - with a premise that these items can be resold to Thredup for 40% of the original price, where they can then be resold on the site. There are a number of troubling components to this campaign. First, its name. "Remade" isn't remade Companies like Eileen Fisher actually remake some of their older garments into new designs, which is a great way to use up textiles that still have life in them, or, in the case of Hackwith Design - who prioritizes sustainable and deadstock fabrics - buy back older styles to resell as an incentive to their customers. And indie brands like Christy Dawn use deadstock fabric , which serves a similar purpose of keeping old textile inventory out of landfills. Thredup's "Remade" lin...
Post contains affiliate links Fair trade, vegan, eco-friendly shoes from Po-Zu and Nicora For the last three years, I have experimented with going vegan for environmental reasons. Industrial animal agriculture is brutal for animals - and that was a factor, too - but going all in required a bigger picture reason for me . And that turned out to be the reality of massive deforestation due to cattle grazing . As more of the world enters the middle class , meat is now more financially accessible to more people, which means global demand continues to rise. I eventually settled on a reduced meat diet rather than total removal, for the benefit of my health and the reality of my context in Southern culture, where meat is almost always a part of social gatherings (the endless potlucks make it easy to be somewhat freegan in these parts, too). In August, I learned something that further contextualized the meat industry: it's about leather, too. See, I thought leather was a secondary ...
Trying to get these link-y posts back up and running. I don't think I've done one since Summer 2017! I read a lot of blogs and articles in any given week, but saving the links somewhere so I can chronicle them here is sometimes too much to ask (and really, no one was asking anyway, but I really love reading these types of posts so it seems like a good idea to create them, too). This month is going to be FULL of features and gift guides, and I'm trying my best to manage my time so that they're the best they can be. I hate to be one of those people who starts talking about December holidays on November 2nd, but working in retail has retrained my brain to think Christmas starts in October, so that's the way it is! Here's what I've been reading this week... Ethical Subculture ✸  Talia reflects on the complexities of want, influencer culture, and comparison ✸  Lyn hosted a really good discussion on the lack of class diversity in the Instagram ethical...
This post was written by Francesca Willow and was originally published on Ethical Unicorn, a blog about ethical fashion and social justice. Reposted with permission. There are many ways to make your approach to fashion, and your own closet, more sustainable. You can move towards more secondhand purchases such as thrifting or finding ethical vintage fashion . You can move away from buying with the trends and find longer-lasting, non-boring personal style instead , or try working towards changing your perspective on spending vs investment , looking at long term money saving (even if it’s more expensive up front) rather than just finding bargains. There really are a hundred different ways to get started, depending on the kind of person you are and what works for you. All of these things are great, otherwise I wouldn’t have written about them, but they also require a little bit of time. Both to implement, and to fully form into new habits and skill that come as second nature, not ...